Ted Killian: Flux Aeterna (PFMCD007)

Jeff Kaiser

BACK IN PRINT! We have 10 copies left…

[playlist ids="668,670,671"]
Ted Killian: Electric and acoustic guitars, samples, loops, sound design

Loop-based guitar improvisations/excursions recorded “live” in the studio in a single take. Ted's music is frequently compared to that of David Torn, Steve Tibbetts, Terje Rypdal, Robert Fripp, Adrian Belew, Sonny Sharrock, Nels Cline, or Bill Frisell, sometimes even David Gilmour, Jeff Beck or Uli Jon Roth. But Ted cites influences that come from all over the map: Leo Kottke, Eliott Sharp, Paul Dresher, Scott Johnson, Vernon Reid, John Abercrombie, Michael Brook, Daniel Lanois, Gary Lucas, Jim Thomas, John Fahey, Jimi Hendrix, John Mclaughlin, Frank Zappa, Pat Metheny, Buckethead, Chet Atkins and Les Paul. Yet, despite this, there is still something uniquely “Killianesque” in his approach. Ted is a guitarist who isn't afraid to paint with the instrument's full color “palette.” He's not afraid to make wild, adventurous, passionate “in-you-face” music or sonorous, languid, peaceful harmonic/melodic explorations.

Ted Killian: A Biography

Born and raised in sunny Southern California, Ted Killian has been a guitarist for over 4 decades now and he still hasn't managed to learn to play the thing correctly. But, as it turns out, this may have turned out to be a pretty good thing. Without necessarily having set out to do so, Killian has found his own unique “voice” on an instrument that is nearly ubiquitous in modern popular music. His sound is a peculiar amalgam of odd, sometimes familiar, influences: folk, pop, blues, rock, metal, jazz, electronica, electro-acoustic “art music,” and just plain noise (“!”) that begs one to think the word “fusion” but is much more primal, gut-level and organic than any connotation that word may conjure.

Killian's music is full of contradictions. It is primitive and sophisticated, visceral and sensitive, abstract and accessible, complex and blood simple all at once. It is given birth by heavy doses of technology (MIDI guitar, a plethora of electronic effects, digital echo devices, samplers, and all manner of assorted “gadgets”) but the result is amazingly human sounding. There is blood and sweat mixed in with all of the diodes and cables — and more than a small measure of passion. This intensity is not something that can be seen in the usual form of typical guitarist “histrionics” but can be heard in every note of the music itself.

Killian began playing and experimenting early on, but (in terms of public performance) bloomed late. Beginning in the late 1980s, he began performing his original music in conjunction with the Ventura New Music Concert Series (Southern California)– aided by close friend and colleague, avant-jazz trumpeter, Jeff Kaiser. So began a long series of ever-changing concerts and presentations all around Southern California. Some of these were in connection to SEAMUS, an acronym for the national “new music” organization: the Society for Electro Acoustic Music in the United States (Killian was introduced to the organization by Kaiser in 1990 and became President of the Los Angeles chapter in 1992). Ted's has been interviewed as a featured composer on “Music of the Americas” on KPFK radio in Los Angeles. Since the debut of “Flux Aeterna” his music has been played on literally dozens of radio stations around the globe and has garnered critical praise in as many publications internationally. In recent years, he has composed music for ballet, “fixed” gallery installations, multi-discipinary art performances, large ensembles and small groups. And, after all of this, Killian has still somehow managed to avoid having ever been in anything resembling a “band.”

Ted Killian is a 1982 graduate of UCSB with a Bachelors degree in visual arts. Since then he has exhibited paintings, sculpture and computer art in a number of galleries, museums and other venues across the country. He was a 1992 appointee to the “Task Force for Visual Arts” in Ventura, CA. He supports his musical/artistic activities with his “day job” as a freelance graphic designer for various musical instrument and high-tech manufacturers. He currently resides in Southern Oregon with his wife, 3 sons, 3 guinea pigs, and 2 goldfish.

pfMENTUM CD007

PFMCD007

Trevor Henthorn: Hipster Modular: The Jacumba Sets (AVRCD010)

Trevor Henthorn: Hipster Modular: The Jacumba Sets (AVRCD010)

Leave a Comment

[playlist ids="13064"]

Englisch

Jacumba Hot Springs is a census-designated place in the Mountain Empire area of southeastern San Diego County, California with an elevation of 862 meters. The Kumeyaay peoples occupied the Jacumba area prior to European settlement. Then, Ranchers occupied the area in the 19th century and were often in conflict with the Indians. At the turn of the 20th century, the health and relaxation benefits of natural hot springs were commercialized. By 1925 the town had a world class hotel and by the 1930s, Jacumba developed into a top destination. After the new Interstate 8 bypassed Jacumba by two miles, most of the roadside service businesses folded and the community went into economic decline. The Jacumba Hotel closed and was destroyed in an arson fire in 1983 and the ruins stood until 1991. The great public baths closed, the swimming pool was filled in, and the well was capped. The area continues to attract foreign visitors, motorcycle tourists, ravers and hipsters. The 21st century hipster is part of a subculture that values independent thinking, counter-culture, progressive politics, an appreciation of art and indie-rock, creativity, intelligence, witty banter and modular or computer-generated modular-like synthesis. Although “hipsterism” is really a state of mind, it is also often intertwined with distinct fashion, polyrhythms and non-just intonations. Despite misconceptions based on their aesthetic tastes, hipsters tend to be well educated and often have liberal arts degrees, or degrees in maths and sciences, which also require certain creative analytical thinking abilities. Consequently many hipsters tend to hold jobs in the music, art, and fashion industries. It is a myth that most hipsters are unemployed and live off of their parent’s trust funds.

These are the Hipster Modular Jacumba Sets.

Elektronik März 2015
Hergestellt in San Diego County
Schnitt und Mastering von T. Henthorn und J. Kaiser
Zusammengestellt von Hipster Modular
http://WhatIsModular.com
modular@WhatIsModular.com

Zum Export zugelassen
von Pan Handler Production
Trading Co., Ltd. vertrieben

Set

1
2
3
4
5
6
7

Dauer

10:10
10:10
10:10
10:10
10:10
10:10
10:10

Zeitmaß

75-160
98
98
105
132
105
165

henthorn5.1

Die Artefakte inspirierten den Klang:
Vielen Dank an Ray für den Gedankenaustausch.
Vielen Dank an Kaiser für den Generator. Fotografien von Kristina.
Ausrüstung: Ableton, KaiGen, Arturia, Moog, Doepfer, PGH Modular, Soundhack, Make Noise,
Elektron, Cycling ’74, Echo Thief, Max for Cats, Roland, Boss, Avid, DMG Audio, iZotope, DSP-Quattro.

S1 – Stücke 1-3
(10:10 Langsam 75-160 b/m 1.25-2.67 Hz)

S2 – Stücke 4-6
(10:10 Lebhaft 98 b/m 1.63Hz)

S3 – Stücke 7-9
(10:10 Mäßig 98 b/m 1.63 Hz)

S4 – Stücke 10-12
(10:10 Rasch 105 b/m 1.75Hz)

S5 – Stücke 13-15
(10:10 Schnell 132 b/m 2.2Hz)

S6 Stücke 16-20
(10:10 Langsam 105 b/m)

S7 Stücke 21-25
(10:10 Bewegt 165 b/m)

Hörspiel:
Zehn:Zehn x 7
Spielzeit 71 min 10 sek
Kalibrierung -24dB

AVRCD010