Peter Kuhn / Dave Sewelson: Our Earth / Our World (PFMCD097)

Jeff Kaiser

[playlist ids="866"]

Peter Kuhn: alto and tenor sax, Bb clarinet
Dave Sewelson: baritone and sopranino sax
Larry Roland: bass • Gerald Cleaver: drums

1) Our Earth 25:22
2) Our World 12:36
3) It Matters 11:07

Our Earth / Our World

“Just because you don’t see me, it doesn’t mean I am gone.”

The music on this CD is beautiful. It moves me to stand on one foot and hop in joy. It's laced with a dark and searing lyricism that one finds on those hot summer nights when the freedom bell tolls and all the heavy weight players would pick up their horns and blow all night. Dave Sewelson, Peter Kuhn, Larry Roland, and Gerald Cleaver are creating their own tradition and it is reborn each time they play.

The music swoops and soars into inner and outer space. Cane reeds vibrating and living in both the urban and celestial worlds at the same time. The sound re-enters with the earth touching it’s own root then resurfacing as colorful flowers made of soil and mud wrapped in a shell of hope that rests on a cradle of freedom. Then the phrase, “Just because you don’t see me, it doesn’t mean I am gone.”

Peter Kuhn who is back on the scene meeting with Dave Sewelson who still remains one of the best kept secrets on the music scene but is a hero in the tone world. Here they cross paths with Larry Roland’s mystical bass and Gerald Cleavers Saturday morning Detroit thrust. I would suggest you clean your palate and give this music a big listen. Veterans are in the house bringing in some of that old time religion. No time to experiment they know exactly where they are going into the unknown where pure creativity lives. 

—William Parker, 2015


 

If I had to choose a way to describe the music that flows through Our Earth/Our World that description would begin with intuition and conversation. The best of freely-improvised music is always rich in these details, and the dialog between Kuhn and Sewelson has obviously stood the test of time.

This disc, recorded on a brisk April evening at the 2015 Arts for Art Festival begins with the sonic swirl of Dave Sewelson’s rough-hewn baritone saxophone jostling against the slinky sinew of Peter Kuhn’s Bb clarinet. Right away, the melodic interplay between the two musicians, (an association that began some 40 years ago) rings true and devastatingly clear. Themes and riffs wrap around each other with serpentine grit and gristle, all with the surety of notated material – yet nothing was written down. “No discussion, no plan, no charts or even concepts,” Kuhn related, via email. “I had never met Larry or Gerald before the set, and they hadn’t played together before this either.”

Kuhn was making reference to the sterling rhythm section of Larry Roland on bass and the marvelous Gerald Cleaver on drums, who both leap into the fray of the 26-minute opener, “Our Earth,” with muscled dialog and multidirectional waves of motion, including a brief drum and bass duet that precedes Kuhn’s screaming essay on tenor saxophone, which wails in the best of the post-Ayler traditions – a sermon of great extremes joined at its orgiastic apex by Sewelson’s equally committed spiraling altissimo pealing. All of this flows atop the crisp martial cadences and precise control of dynamics initiated by Cleaver’s snare and the depth of Roland’s arco and pizzicato accompaniment. Sewelson returns on the tiny sopranino saxophone – his sound is dark, fat, and swollen with sonic fertility. Once again, the horns entwine and spiral into deep conversation. A joyous beginning.

Cleaver, an acknowledged master of subtle gestures, opens the second selection, “Our World,” with a stunning drum narrative that leads both hornmen into a writhing jostle of overtones on sopranino and clarinet, respectively, over the relentless ostinato of Roland. Back on baritone, Sewelson whinnies and squeals, all while alluding to an almost Motown-like pocket as Kuhn’s tenor reengages, stoking the fire with chortling repetitions and bone-chilling eruptions into the upper register.
That sense of joyful audacity deepens when Roland unleashes a monstrous solo to introduce the final selection, “It Matters,” where Kuhn’s lithe Bb clarinet burrows a serpentine course deep into the heart of the music, all the while guided by the ebb and flow of Cleaver’s drums, which both explode and illuminate.

You can feel the enthusiasm of the packed house – not just in the applause that peppers each selection – but in the spontaneous gasps and groans that accompany several unforgettable moments of deep listening. Turn it up. Enjoy. Repeat.

—Robert Bush, 2016

© 2016 Dependent Origination Music, ASCAP

Recorded at Arts For Arts Our Earth/Our World series, NYC, April 2015

Mastered by Wayne Peet, Newzone Studio, Los Angeles

Photos ©2016 Michael Klayman. Used by permission.

Layout, Jeff Kaiser

pfMENTUM CD097

PFMCD097

PFMCD096_Back

Steuart Liebig / MINIM: Sulphur (PFMCD046)

Jeff Kaiser

[playlist ids="458,460"]
Steuart Liebig/MINIM

Andrew Pask: clarinet and bass clarinet
Sara Schoenbeck: bassoon
Brad Dutz: Drumset, percussion and marimba
Steuart Liebig: C, Eb, 12-string and prepared Contrabass guitars

1–23. Kaleidoscope (44:44)
24. The Cherry Blossom Is Only Perfect When It’s Falling from the Tree (17:16)
25. Necrological Pieties (4:16)

“Kaleidoscope” is a piece made up of 23 miniatures based on haiku. “ The Cherry Blossom Is Only Perfect When It’s Falling from the Tree” is a single movement of 13 parts based loosely on terza rima. “Necrological Pieties” was written for choreographer Shuriu Lo.

Copyright 2007 Steuart Liebig/Sisong Music (ASCAP)

Recorded January 13–14, 2007, by Wayne Peet; Mixed February and March 2007, by Wayne Peet and Steuart Liebig; all at Newzone Studios, Mar Vista, California
Conducting help from Wayne on Kaleidoscope 10, 12, 16 and 23
Brad Dutz uses Yamaha, Vic Firth, Paiste, Remo, Roland, Mountain Rythym and Factory Metal Percussion musical products
Steuart Liebig plays Fodera Basses, uses the Raven Labs PMB-1, and uses Fodera roundwound strings (Eb and C and 12-string basses)
Band photos by Ken Luey; Other photos/montages and layout by Steuart Liebig
Big thanks to Brad, Andrew and Sara; Also big thanks to Mr. Wayne
Thanks Leslie, Anya and Aron

pfMENTUM CD046

PFMCD046

Emily Hay / Brad Dutz / Wayne Peet (PFMCD043)

Jeff Kaiser

[playlist ids="452"]
Emily Hay: Flute, Alto Flute, Vocals, Fx
Wayne Peet: Piano, Organ, Theremin
Brad Dutz: Percussion

Recorded 04-02-05
Edited 06-06-05
Mixed And Mastered 02-04-06
Newzone Sudio, Los Angeles
Wayne Peet, Engineer

Cover Painting By Kaoru: Untitled #61
Graphic Assistance: Ted Killian
Record Executive: Jeff Kaiser
Brad thanks: Yamaha, Vic Firth, Paiste, Factory Metal Percussion, Remo, Roland

#1. Bean Dip 5:57
#2. Filthy Washer 5:08
#3. It Can Be Thick 5:03
#4. Metamorphasize 9:43
#5. Coming! 8:17
#6. Hot Japanese Water 4:44
#7. Amnesia Dealer 8:26
#8. A Lotta T’s 6:35
#9. Possum 12:27

© Emily Hay, Emily Hay Music, BMI
© Brad Dutz, Leaky Spleen Music, BMI
© Wayne Peet, Killzone Music, BMI

pfMENTUM CD043

PFMCD043

Brad Dutz: When Manatees Attack (PFMCD042)

Jeff Kaiser

[playlist ids="450"]
Paul Sherman: oboe, english horn

James Sullivan: bass clarinet, G clarinet

Rachel Arnold: cello

Brad Dutz: marimba, vibes, xylophone, congas, bongos, bones, cajon, riq, doumbec, darabuka, and other percussion products he hit when the computer was on

special guest
Jasper Dutz: Bb clarinet on Insulated Potato Wedges

recorded by Wayne Peet at NEWZONE studio july 24 and 25, 2006
mixed and mastered by Wayne Peet a bit later
thanks very much to these groovy companies for
product support and endorsements: Yamaha, Paiste,
Vic Firth, Roland (Aaahh! Steve Fisher), Factory
Metal Percussion, Mountain Rythym, Remo
cover painting by Kaoru – To Osaka Airport
graphic assistance Ted Killian

the tunes:
1. Spongy Bark (7:22)
2. I’m Thinkin’ About Buyin’ A Chainsaw (8:50)
3. Insulated Potato Wedges (5:52)
4. Mutilated Grass (13:55)
5. Biff The Salesman (9:21)
6. Soiled Palm (8:37)
7. Hiram Becomes Ulysses (10:26)
8. When Manatees Attack (8:48)
total: 73:32

all selections composed by Brad Dutz except Insulated Potato Wedges
by Jasper and Brad Dutz
© Copyright 2007 Leakyspleen Music, BMI
to contact brad about bookings or comments: bdutz@dslextreme.com

pfMENTUM CD042

PFMCD042

Trevor Henthorn: Hipster Modular: The Jacumba Sets (AVRCD010)

Trevor Henthorn: Hipster Modular: The Jacumba Sets (AVRCD010)

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[cue id="223"]

 

Englisch

Jacumba Hot Springs is a census-designated place in the Mountain Empire area of southeastern San Diego County, California with an elevation of 862 meters. The Kumeyaay peoples occupied the Jacumba area prior to European settlement. Then, Ranchers occupied the area in the 19th century and were often in conflict with the Indians. At the turn of the 20th century, the health and relaxation benefits of natural hot springs were commercialized. By 1925 the town had a world class hotel and by the 1930s, Jacumba developed into a top destination. After the new Interstate 8 bypassed Jacumba by two miles, most of the roadside service businesses folded and the community went into economic decline. The Jacumba Hotel closed and was destroyed in an arson fire in 1983 and the ruins stood until 1991. The great public baths closed, the swimming pool was filled in, and the well was capped. The area continues to attract foreign visitors, motorcycle tourists, ravers and hipsters. The 21st century hipster is part of a subculture that values independent thinking, counter-culture, progressive politics, an appreciation of art and indie-rock, creativity, intelligence, witty banter and modular or computer-generated modular-like synthesis. Although “hipsterism” is really a state of mind, it is also often intertwined with distinct fashion, polyrhythms and non-just intonations. Despite misconceptions based on their aesthetic tastes, hipsters tend to be well educated and often have liberal arts degrees, or degrees in maths and sciences, which also require certain creative analytical thinking abilities. Consequently many hipsters tend to hold jobs in the music, art, and fashion industries. It is a myth that most hipsters are unemployed and live off of their parent’s trust funds.

These are the Hipster Modular Jacumba Sets.

Elektronik März 2015
Hergestellt in San Diego County
Schnitt und Mastering von T. Henthorn und J. Kaiser
Zusammengestellt von Hipster Modular
http://WhatIsModular.com
modular@WhatIsModular.com

Zum Export zugelassen
von Pan Handler Production
Trading Co., Ltd. vertrieben

Set

1
2
3
4
5
6
7

Dauer

10:10
10:10
10:10
10:10
10:10
10:10
10:10

Zeitmaß

75-160
98
98
105
132
105
165

henthorn5.1

Die Artefakte inspirierten den Klang:
Vielen Dank an Ray für den Gedankenaustausch.
Vielen Dank an Kaiser für den Generator. Fotografien von Kristina.
Ausrüstung: Ableton, KaiGen, Arturia, Moog, Doepfer, PGH Modular, Soundhack, Make Noise,
Elektron, Cycling ’74, Echo Thief, Max for Cats, Roland, Boss, Avid, DMG Audio, iZotope, DSP-Quattro.

S1 – Stücke 1-3
(10:10 Langsam 75-160 b/m 1.25-2.67 Hz)

S2 – Stücke 4-6
(10:10 Lebhaft 98 b/m 1.63Hz)

S3 – Stücke 7-9
(10:10 Mäßig 98 b/m 1.63 Hz)

S4 – Stücke 10-12
(10:10 Rasch 105 b/m 1.75Hz)

S5 – Stücke 13-15
(10:10 Schnell 132 b/m 2.2Hz)

S6 Stücke 16-20
(10:10 Langsam 105 b/m)

S7 Stücke 21-25
(10:10 Bewegt 165 b/m)

Hörspiel:
Zehn:Zehn x 7
Spielzeit 71 min 10 sek
Kalibrierung -24dB

AVRCD010

William C. Harrington: Urban Electronic Music (AVRCD005)

William C. Harrington: Urban Electronic Music (AVRCD005)

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[cue id="229"]

1. The Overture (5:00)
2. God Bless the Miners (3:40)
3. Enola Gay (4:30)
4. Cuckoo to You (3:57)
5. Belles I (0:40)
6. Remnants (5:14)
7. Jungle Birds (3:03)
8. Days Left (5:16)
9. Organ Song part 1 (6:01)
10. Belles II (2:01)
11. My Guitar (4:04)
12. BOX (3:48)
13. One For Nick (2:55)
14. I Slept Through Vespers (4:53)

Equipment used: Arp 2600, Kawai K4, E-mu Classic Keys, Roland VK-7, CA-30, CM-32L, soprano sax, electric guitar, bowed electric guitar, glass salad bowls, communion bells, cell phone, army bugle, Max/MSP, Radial, GarageBand, vocalizations and loops

Composed, realized, produced and engineered by William C. Harrington
All pieces recorded between 4/05 and 8/05 at the WCH Electronic Music Lab, except Enola Gay which was recorded in 1973 at Cal State Domiguez Hills Electronic Music Lab

Mastered by Scott Fraser at Architecture, Los Angeles, CA
Photos: William C. Harrington • Graphic Arts: Justin Cassidy
© 2006 William C. Harrington, ASCAP • UrbanElectronicMusic.com

William C. Harrington was born January 10th, 1952 in Yonkers, New York. His grandmother played piano at silent movie theaters and had quite an influence on him: by the time he was a sophomore in high school, he was working as a professional musician playing parties, roller-skating rinks, and more.

While at Cal State Dominguez Hills (now UC Dominguez Hills) he studied composition, performance, and electronic music with Richard Bunger, who authored the classic book, “The Well Prepared Piano.”

After leaving college he worked in the wholesale record industry for two years before going on tour. First with Natalie Cole doing lighting, then with Gentle Giant, Frank Zappa (making a brief, credited appearance in Zappa’s movie, “Baby Snakes”), LTD, Rick Derringer, and Rick James, all in various technical positions.

In the 80’s he became the Supervisor of Operations, Videotape Operations, Paramount Pictures Corp. In that capacity, he received four ATAS Emmy certificates for contributions for “Cheers,” one for “The Arsenio Hall Show,” plus one for best sitcom, again, “Cheers.” In 1990 he became a freelance videotape engineer – doing videoasst, 24 frame playback – and Technical Director. Credits have included “Little Black Book” and “Alpha Dog” as well as several sitcoms.

Urban Electronic Music was constructed using loops recorded over a 30-year period, analog and digital synthesis, as well as traditional instruments and found objects.

AVRCD005