VINNY GOLIA: EVEN TO THIS DAY…: MOVEMENT ONE: INOCULATIONS (PFMCD145)

Jeff Kaiser

VINNY GOLIA
EVEN TO THIS DAY…
MOVEMENT ONE: INOCULATIONS

MUSIC FOR ORCHESTRA AND SOLOISTS

[playlist ids="13222"]

(Inoculation: to inoculate)

This applies to vaccinating against the coronavirus and to mentally preparing ourselves to be strong against the onset of paranoia, boredom, depression, isolation, apathy, and all of the other symptoms of this disease that we did not anticipate.

Even to this day… comprises three movements. Movement One: Inoculations, which you are listening to now, is for orchestra and 21 improvisers. The complete length of Inoculations is 10 hours and 32 minutes and consists of 12 individual Modules. The second movement, Part Two: Syncretism: for the draw… is for metal band and orchestra and will be released in early 2022. Finally, as yet unnamed, the third movement for symphony orchestra and large ensemble with improvisers will be completed at the end of 2022.

I started writing Even to this day… for my 75th birthday a year before it was to happen at the request of Rent Romus, who was organizing a concert of 75 musicians to perform the piece, unaware that Covid lurked around the corner. The performance never happened. So, I decided to go for what I wanted using real and virtual musicians performing composed music combined with improvisation—which always seems to be the best way to get what I want musically—a blend of serenity, intensity, and stability that shifts like the sands in a desert. And, as I wanted to have many of the West Coast musicians I play with represented in the music, I came up with a plan to have soloists play over a large and continually changing symphonic setting.

Even to this day… includes soloistic journeys, short interludes, transitional forms, and improvisations involving orchestral textures. Performed live, I would have used a combination of conducting techniques I have been refining since the first concert of the Vinny Golia Large Ensemble in 1982. Unfortunately, I could not do this live because of Covid restrictions and instead created an alternate composition system to supplant and expand on those techniques. Our West Coast community of creative musicians is vast and intensely innovative, and from this communal pool, I used improvisers accustomed to performing New Music and freer forms of improvisation. Specific compositions showcase their creative talents, resulting in a myriad of improvisational approaches. For the listener, the modules within each movement can be arranged in any order but are best listened to in their original order as the compositions within each module accent each other.

Movement One: Inoculations is the first part of over a year’s worth of work on Even to this day… The movement is a direct response to Covid, reflecting feelings and thoughts while locked down or “safer at home” for 15+ months now. With so much discord in the world at the moment, the chance for a few of us to collaborate on something positive seemed a great way to fight back, peacefully, against the malaise of fear, uncertainty, isolation, hostility, and depression. So, this orchestral project started in March 2020 is now ready to add the final component, the listener…

12 CD SET WITH FEATURED SOLOISTS:

Steve Adams—Sopranino and Alto Saxophones, Alto and Bass Flutes, and Electronics • Matt Barbier—Euphonium and Trombone • Kyle Bruckmann—Oboe, English Horn, and Electronics • Dan Clucas—Cornet • Clint Dotson—Drums • Tim Feeney—Percussion • Ken Filiano—Bass • Randy Gloss—Hand Drums and Electronic Percussion • Nathan Hubbard—Drums and Percussion • Jeff Kaiser—Trumpet and Electronics • Ellington Peet—Drums • Wayne Peet—Piano, Organ, and Synth • Vicki Ray—Prepared Piano • Sarah Belle Reid—Trumpet and Electronics • Steven Ricks—Trombone and Electronics • William Roper—Bombardondino, Tuba, and Extemporaneous Spoken Word • Derek Stein—Cello • Cassia Streb—Viola • Brian Walsh—Bb, Bass, Contralto, and ContraBass Clarinets • Miller Wrenn—Bass • Vinny Golia—Woodwinds, Gongs, and Singing Bowls

Module 1 — Observation

Module 2 — Belief

Module 3 — Goals-analyzation and clarification

Module 4 — Determination

Module 5 — Identification and Orientation

Module 6 — Skills and Knowledge (qualities and abilities)

Module 7 — Collaborations

Module 8 — The Plan

Module 9 — Visualizations

Module 10 — Persistence

Module 11 — Action and Decision

Module 12 — Needs and Uses

All Compositions and Arrangements by Vinny Golia ©2021 Ninewinds, BMI

Trapezoid by Randy Gloss • Recorded by Wayne Peet and Vinny Golia (with additional remote recording by solo artists) • Recorded from March 2020 to August 2021 • Edited, Mixed, and Mastered by Wayne Peet • Produced by Vinny Golia and Wayne Peet • Disc Artwork by Steuart Liebig • Cover Design and Artwork by Ted Killian • Special thanks to Wayne Peet, Kathy Carbone, Jeff Kaiser, California Institute of the Arts, and all the performers on this project.

A joint release of Ninewinds Records and NWCD450 / PFMCD145

VINNY GOLIA
EVEN TO THIS DAY…
MOVEMENT ONE: INOCULATIONS

MUSIC FOR ORCHESTRA AND SOLOISTS

Module 1

Observation

1. Moai 3 VC — BS • Soloist: Vinny Golia — Contrabass Clarinet

2. CB Flute Real One — Explained1 • Soloist: Vinny Golia — Contrabass Clarinet

3. 2 — 9 Dizzy 2 — A dedication

4. Moai 3 — 5 Middle section • Soloists: Kyle Bruckmann — Eng Hrn; Matt Barbier — Trom

5. From the Ancient Race • Soloists: Vinny Golia — Alto Sax; Dan Clucas — Cornet

6. Project — 1 — Transition • Soloists: Vinny Golia — Baritone Saxophone, Gongs; William Roper — Tuba; Nate Hubbard — Drums

7. The Real One

8. Brass — As played on the Nagra • Soloists: Vinny Golia — Sopranino Saxophone; Dan Clucas — Trumpet

9. Escape from the lab, Professor Deemer doesnít make it • Soloist: Vinny Golia — Gongs

10. Hand me Lieutenant Liu’s notebook of justice… • Soloist: Vinny Golia — Ram’s Horn, Eb Clarinet, Baritone Saxophone

11. Toolboxes and tradeoffs — For Pete Edwards • Soloist: Vinny Golia — C Flute

12. No horn Intro,…, just kidding • Soloist: Dan Clucas — Trp

13. So many forms, the low frequencies • Soloists: Wayne Peet — E Piano; Ellington Peet — Drums

14. For Art, the hole puncher • Soloists: Vinny Golia — Contrabass Clarinet, Gong; Brian Walsh — Bass Clarinet; Tim Feeney — Perc

Module 2

Belief

15. The Rams Horn Moai, a gift from Peru • Soloist: Vinny Golia — Ram’s Horn, Tenor Sax, G and F Mezzo — Soprano Sax, Bells

16. Not Pelham, (the Throwback!). • Soloists: Wayne Peet — Synth; Ellington Peet — Drums

17. It’s a jumble out there! • Soloist: Tim Feeney — Perc

18. letters to Francis • Soloists: Vinny Golia — Soprano Saxophone; Miller Wrenn — Bass

19. The complete Hermann • Soloists: Sarah Reid — Trp and FX; Tim Feeney — Perc

20. The first time I heard that • Soloists: Vinny Golia — Xiao; Tim Feeney — Perc

21. Encomium • Soloists: Vinny Golia — Singing Bowls; Brian Walsh — Bass Clarinet; Randy Gloss — Bendir Drum

22. 2 — 7 — 3 — sracps — 2

23. 1 — 18 strgs whole — No Mayo • Soloist: Vinny Golia — Tenor Saxophone, Contrabass Clarinet

24. 2 — 7 — 3 — sracps — The Original

Module 3

Goals — Analyzation and Clarification

25. For John… • Soloist: Vinny Golia — Tenor Saxophone

26. Low Toaani • Soloist: Wayne Peet — Organ and FX

27. Locus — 2 • Soloist: Brian Walsh — Clarinet

28. Xiphoid • Soloists: Steve Adams — Sopranino Saxophone, William Roper — Bombardondino (Travel Tuba)

29. Yet another, New Vamp Tune

30. Message from Time • Soloists: Sarah Reid — Trp and FX; Derek Stein — Cello

31. The battle of Tibet — Circa 1943 • Soloist: William Roper — Bombardondino (Travel Tuba)

32. From the Ancient Race; Symbolism • Soloists: Vinny Golia — Bb Clarinet; Clint Dodson — Drums

33. Warp and Woof (on the road to Georgia) • Soloists: Jeff Kaiser — Trp; William Roper — Vocal

34. The Attic of the Unknown Foe, for Mr. Martin • Soloist: VG — Eb Clarinet, Ab Clar, Contrabass Clar, Basset Horn, Gongs and Bowls

35. Low Toaani — Part Two • Soloist: Sarah Reid — Trp and FX

Module 4

Determination

36. Easy to Sneak Up On

37. Doctor Savaard explains his theory eloquently, but no ones listens

38. Dizzy — a second dedication because he deserves it!

39. nmae later, (not a typo…) • Soloist: Jeff Kaiser — Trp and FX

40. Kyle! • Soloist — Kyle Bruckmann — English Horn

41. Intro Drake — 1 — 2 • Soloists: Vinny Golia — Bass Clarinet; Randy Gloss — Tabla

42. Who is Gladys Glover? — Bass; Nate Hubbard — Drums

43. Not Hardly… • Soloist: Jeff Kaiser — Trp

44. 1 — 14 Solo Section 2 • Soloists: — Vinny Golia — Bass Saxophone; Nate Hubbard — Drums

45. In France you sit on long items shaped like canoes — for Barre • Soloist: Dan Clucas — Cornet

46. For Vicki • Soloist: Vinny Golia — Contraalto Clarinet; Vicki Ray — Piano

47. Trapazoid • Soloist: Randy Gloss — Frame Drum

48. Mr. Fletcher now heads towards Mexico to find his first move,…or else, it ís up to him • Soloist: Ken Filiano — Bass

49. 1 — 9 31120 not exactly Vlatkovich, (title wise…) • Soloist: Steven Ricks — Trom

50. 1 — 5 bridhge to solos • Soloists: Vinny Golia — G — Piccolo; Tim Feeney — Perc

Module 5

Identification and Orientation

51. Shadow

52. Vicki 2 • Soloist: Vicki Ray — single track of prepared piano with E — Bow

53. By which they lead • Soloists: Miller Wrenn — Bass; Tim Feeney — Perc

54. About three more days, give or take a day or two

55. Ken • Soloist: Ken Filiano — Bass

56. The return of Tyler Bob! (I know that guy!)

57. “Hey Cosmo, How you Doin’…doin’ ok…” — for Fumo

58. Your devotion to etiquette is admirable but your methods leave much to be desired

59. The Wilhelm Scream (not alligator shoes I hope!) • Soloists: Vinny Golia — Baritone Saxophone; Randy Gloss — Daf

60. He’s the only one that’s happy!

61. In Between The Winds • Soloist: Brian Walsh — Clarinet

62. Indeterminate growth • Soloist: Tim Feeney — Perc

63. Dixie Cups and Strings • Soloists: Derek Stein — Cello; Miller Wrenn — Bass

64. The Solution • Soloist: Steve Adams — Electronics

Module 6

Skills and Knowledge (qualities and abilities)

65. Try This One On

66. nmae again, later • Soloists: Ken Filiano — Bass and FX

67. Time Change

68. The Octopus boy, (good work Rachel)

69. Trpt Partial

70. It must fall out of my formation circle

71. The Octopus boy; retake • Soloist: Wayne Peet — Organ

72. All is lost, All is lost! • Soloists: Wayne Peet — Synth; Steve Adams — Alto Sax; Nate Hubbard — Drums

73. And it’s also the name of a man who operates hotels

74. Mead and various secrets from the island • Soloists: Steve Adams — Bass Flute; Randy Gloss — Frame Drum and Metal Perc

75. The Internet is always open • Soloist: Derek Stein — Cello

76. And, Have A Nice Day, (Or Else!) • Soloist: Dan Clucas — Trp

77. It’s Douner Stieglitz camera lenses!

78. An Arc of Electricity • Soloist: Jeff Kaiser — Trp and FX

79. From the Ancient Race; Electrodes • Soloists: Wayne Peet — Piano; Clint Dodson — Drums

80. Lonely wind • Soloists: Cassia Streb — Viola; Derek Stein — Cello

INSERT SIDE TWO

Module 7

Collaborations

81. For Robin

82. History does not linger long in our century; reprise

83. Vicki project 5 • Soloists: Vinny Golia — Basset Horn; Vicki Ray — Prepared Piano

84. Never Freed • Soloist: Vinny Golia — Bass Clarinet, Soprillo Sax

85. Transition #1 • Soloist: Steven Ricks — Trom

86. Sketch • Soloists: Miller Wrenn — Bass; Clint Dodson — Drums

87. The Stretchy, Walky, Thingy • Soloists: Vinny Golia — Bari Sax; Ken Filiano — Bass; Ellington Peet — Drums

88. The Great American Biotic Interchange • Soloists: Vinny Golia — A Clarinet; Wayne Peet — Prepared Piano

89. Aver • Soloist: Clint Dodson — Drums

90. The original five! • Soloists: Vinny Golia — Bass Saxophone; Wayne Peet — Synth

91. Unit! • Soloists: Matt Barbier — Trom; Miller Wrenn — Bass

92. Robin 2 and For Richard Nunns Medley • Soloist: Vinny Golia — Gongs, Bowls, Shells

93. Villions • Soloists: Miller Wrenn — Bass (section parts); Ken Filiano — Bass and FX

94. Cassia • Soloist: Cassia Streb — Viola

Module 8

The Plan

95. Moai 3 addition

96. To the skin together

97. Flight 575 • Soloist : Steve Adams — Electronics, Alto Sax; Miller Wrenn — Bass; Clint Dodson — Drums

98. Transition #2 • Soloist: Steven Ricks — Trom

99. A to B, Pull the chutes, where’s my champagne? • Soloist: Jeff Kaiser — Trp

100. Pharoah at the chord change • Soloist: Vinny Golia — Tenor Saxophone

101. Harmonics…!!!!!?????

102. What’s your name? • Soloist: William Roper — Bombardondino (Travel Tuba) and Vocal

103. Studebakers, Toasters, and Crop-dusters • Soloist: Vinny Golia — Bass Sax; Nate Hubbard — Drums

104. The 18th form • Soloist: Vinny Golia — Bass Flute; Wayne Peet — Piano Keys; Vicki Ray — Piano Insides

105. Do you have an opinion..? • Soloist: Vinny Golia — Bari Sax

106. Toanni — Insert • Soloists: William Roper — Tuba; Nate Hubbard — Drums

107. The Filiano Way, an Introduction to Mr. Ken… • Soloist: Ken Filiano — Bass and FX

108. The Island of One Thousand Names

Module 9

Visualizations

109. …These 3 together • Soloist: Vinny Golia — Native American Flute

110. Public Swimming Pool • Soloist: Dan Clucas — Cornet

111. Moai 3 — 13

112. Dr. Karmackís tasty treats… • Soloista: Vinny Golia — Alto Saxophone; Vicki Ray — Prepared Piano

113. Transition #3 • Soloist: Steven Ricks — Trom and FX

114. Will Warren Chesnick go to the prom alone…I think not!

115. The Thayer Effect, we like what it does • Soloists: Vinny Golia — Gongs; Miller Wrenn — Bass

116. Whiteside speaking • Soloist: Vinny Golia — Gongs, Tubax (contrabass saxophone)

117. All the Ghosts we can have

118. Bowed Interlude — for Mark Dresser • Soloists: Vinny Golia — Gongs, Contra Alto Clarinet; Matt Barbier — Trom

119. Moai 3 — 5 • Soloist: Matt Barbier — Euphonium

120. 1 — 13 — w harp

121. The lipkenstein process • Soloist: Ken Filiano — Bass and FX

Module 10

Persistence

122. Events that have happened are happening again, as we speak • Soloist: Vinny Golia — Tenor Saxophone, Indonesian Flute, Gongs; Wayne Peet — Piano

123. Big Finnish for Rent and Heiki

124. Double duos • Soloist: Vinny Golia — Soprillo Sax, Bass Clarinet

125. Strange Man, but still, a good plan. • Soloist: Wayne Peet — Piano

126. Bedtime • Soloists: Vinny Golia — Bamboo Flute, Sopranino Sax; Clint Dodson — Drums

127. And I remember…everything • Soloist: Vinny Golia — Gongs

128. Moai 3 — 1

129. A gift for Mike • Soloist: Ken Filiano — Bass

130. How’d it get burned!!, How’d it get burned!!, How’d it get burned!!, How’d it get burned!!

131. Project 1 • Soloists: Vinny Golia — Bari Sax, Gongs; William Roper — Tuba; Nate Hubbard — Drums

132. Persistance for William • Soloists: Vinny Golia — Shakuhachi; Cassia Streb — Viola; Tim Feeney — Perc

133. The Intro • Soloist: Ken Filiano — Bass and FX

134. Vicki 6 • Soloists: Vinny Golia — Contrabass Clarinet; Vicki Ray — Prepared Piano

135. A Philosophy of the Bass — for Bert

Module 11

Action and Decision

136. Moai 3 — 4 Medley • Soloist: Vinny Golia — Conch, Sopranino Saxophone

137. But it was all just a dream… • Soloists: Vinny Golia — A Clarinet; Cassia Streb — Viola

138. From the Ancient Race II

139. Moai 3 — 2 Textures

140. “Your friend is intelligent, he will know better, than to follow me”

141. Bad Dentist • Soloist: Vinny Golia — Basset Horn

142. Someplace called…not Furiya • Soloists: Vinny Golia — Conch, Shakuhachi; Clint Dodson — Drums

143. Isochronus

144. Travk 5 • Soloist: Vicki Ray — Prepared Piano

145. Moai 3 — 10 • Soloist: Vinny Golia — Tenor Saxophone, Globular Flute

146. Elegy for Don LaFontaine • Soloist: Brian Walsh — Bass Clarinet

147. LE Spring 2020 — 7 — B section

Module 12

Needs and Uses

148. Goliath • Soloist: Vinny Golia — Sopranino Saxophone

149. The Rolisican government questions Fukoda’s support, in the cave of Neon (Perhaps it’s the radiation?) • Soloist: Tim Feeney — Perc

150. LE Spring 2020 — 7

151. An Unforeseen Side Effect

152. Gombus! • Soloist: Sarah Reid — Trp and FX

153. Intro Drake 1 and 2 • Soloists: Vinny Golia — Bass Clarinet; Randy Gloss — Tabla

154. Waterflute Piece (Susan makes glorious instruments!) • Soloist: Vinny Golia — Alto Flute, Waterflute and Globular Flutes

155. LE Spring 2020 — 6 — redone • Soloist: Vinny Golia — Alto Clarinet, Gongs

156. All that Shimmers… • Soloist: Randy Gloss — Tamb

157. Dedicated to Bobby, John, and Horace • Soloists: Vinny Golia — Basset Hrn; Derek Stein — Cello

158. Return of the Goliath • Soloist: Wayne Peet — Pipe Organ

Photo by Chuck Koton

David Borgo: Suite of Uncommon Sorrows (PFMCD144)

Jeff Kaiser

David Borgo – Suite of Uncommon Sorrows

(Digital only)

[playlist ids="13124"]

The Suite of Uncommon Sorrows in an eleven-part suite of original music composed in response to the tumultuous events of 2020, including the devastating COVID-19 pandemic, the growing Black Lives Matter movement, and the debilitating polarization of U.S. politics that made it impossible to address either of these adequately.

Each movement explores a different “uncommon sorrow,” such as kuebiko (a state of moral exhaustion inspired by acts of horror in the news, which forces you to revise your image of what can happen in this world), kenopsia (the eerie, forlorn atmosphere of a place that’s usually bustling with people but is now abandoned and quiet), chrysalism (an amniotic-like tranquility while a storm rages outside), liberosis (an ache to let things go; a desire to hold your life loosely and playfully), zenosyne (the sense that time keeps going faster), and pâro (the feeling that no matter what you do it will always be inadequate).

1. Kuebiko

A state of moral exhaustion inspired by acts of horror in the news, which forces you to revise your image of what can happen in this world

2. Chrysalism

An amniotic-like tranquility, similar to how one feels while wrapped in a blanket sitting inside on the couch while a storm rages outside.

3. Kenopsia

The eerie, forlorn atmosphere of a place that’s usually bustling with people but is now abandoned and quiet

4. Liberosis

An ache to let things go; a desire to hold your life loosely and playfully

5. Paro

The feeling that no matter what you do it will always be inadequate

6. Occhiolism

The awareness of the limitations of your own perspective

7. One Step Forward Two Steps Back

The feeling that although progress is being made, it produces a reaction that is somehow greater than equal and opposite

8. The Village COVIDiots

An inversion of Eric Dolphy’s “Out To Lunch”

9. Gnossienne

A moment of awareness that someone you have known for years still has a private and mysterious inner life that will remain unknowable to you

10. Zenosyne

The sense that time keeps going faster

11. Gugulethu

A township outside of Cape Town, South Africa, its name is a contraction of igugu lethu, which is Xhosa for “our pride” (for Winston Mankunku Ngozi)

 


 

David Borgo – tenor and soprano (4,8) saxophones, aerophone (9)

Tobin Chodos – piano and keyboard (9)

Mackenzie Leighton – acoustic and electric (9) bass

Mark Ferber – drum set

Peter Sprague – electric guitar (6,9,10)

King Britt – electronics (9)


All music composed by David Borgo

©2021 David Borgo Music, ASCAP

Recorded by Peter Sprague, Spragueland Studio

Mixed and Mastered by Wayne Peet, Newzone Studio

Cover photo by Sasha Freemind on Unsplash

Titles from dictionaryofobscuresorrows.com

pfMENTUM PFMCD144

Sean Hamilton: Table for One (PFMCD135)

Jeff Kaiser

[playlist ids="3708"]

A collection of improvised vignettes for solo drum set, percussion, and vuvuzela

Currently nowhere,
Carrying nothing.

(Evolvement)
Acquiescence of, the

present
linear
impermanent

burgeon, [blossom]
bloom.

Table for One.

Back:
Table for One
Sean Hamilton

1. Cash Only
2. Value King
3. Solo Sport (1)
4. Energy Vampire
5. Solo Sport (2)
6. Acquiescence Of
7. Cynic Finick
8. Spiral/Summons
9. Acquiescence Of (reprise)
10. Growth/Bloom; Wilt
11. Dusk, Valley
12. Table for One

Table for One is a collection of short improvisations that explore my interests in the drum set as a solo instrument and as a vehicle for the merging of my creative interests that include contemporary classical music, free improvisation, noise, sound art, and electroacoustic music. Several of the takes feature additional traditional and found percussion instruments that are placed on the drums in an effort to expand the timbral possibilities of the kit. Except for a loose length limit, these improvisations were recorded without any predetermined concepts, structures, or forms.
-SH, August 2019

Improvised and recorded live in studio, St. Petersburg, Florida, February 2019

Recorded and mixed by Dan Byers, Rock Garden Recording
Mastered by Wayne Peet, Newzone Studio
Art and Layout by Eli Blasko

www.seanhamiltonmusic.com

PFMCD135
Copyright 2019

Jason Robinson / Janus Ensemble: Resonant Geographies (PFMLP115)

Jeff Kaiser

[playlist ids="1360"]

PLEASE NOTE: THIS PAGE IS FOR PURCHASING THE DOUBLE LP (VINYL) VERSION.
Please click here for the CD.

Resonant Geographies
Jason Robinson

Jason Robinson’s Janus Ensemble:
Jason Robinson—tenor and soprano saxophones, alto flute
JD Parran—alto and contra alto clarinets, bass flute
Oscar Noriega—Bb and bass clarinets, alto saxophone
Marty Ehrlich—bass clarinet, alto saxophone, flute
Michael Dessen—trombone
Bill Lowe—bass trombone, tuba
Marcus Rojas—tuba
Liberty Ellman—guitar
Drew Gress—bass
George Schuller—drums
Ches Smith—drums, glockenspiel

Recorded at Systems Two, Brooklyn, NY, January 5-6, 2016
Engineered and mixed by Mike Marciano
Produced by Jason Robinson
Recording session produced by Steph Robinson
Recording session assistant: Jamie Sandel
Mastered by Rich Breen, Dogmatic Studios, Burbank, CA
All images by David Gloman. Cover, West Worthington Falls, 2016, 17×21 inches, acrylic on paper (detail). Side A label, Bear Den Falls, 2016, 17×22 inches, acrylic on paper (detail). Side B label, Westfield River, 2016, 17×21 inches, acrylic on paper (detail). Side C label, Gold in Brook Falls, 2016, 11×14 inches, acrylic on paper (detail). Side D label, Gunn Brook Falls, 2015, 18×23 inches, acrylic on paper (detail).
Photography by Scott Friedlander, (c) 2016, used with permission
Graphic design by Ted Killian

Track Titles:

Side A:
Facing East (10:41)
Futures Unimagined (8:12)

Side B:
Confluence (6:55)
Dreaming (8:24)

Side C:
Facing West (6:31)
Circuitry Unbound (8:44)

Side D:
Outcropping (12:14)

All compositions by Jason Robinson (ASCAP)
All rights reserved ℗ and © 2018 Jason Robinson

https://youtu.be/-43JeWvAKRI

Arriving in Montreal in the middle of the Janus Ensemble tour, I watched as my fellow trombonist Bill Lowe wrangled his enormous tuba and bass trombone cases out of the van, through sub-zero winds and icy sidewalks, and into the tiny club where we’d soon perform. This would be a challenge for someone half Bill’s age, but he was unfazed, focused only on warming up all that metal in time for the soundcheck.

We’d been driving all day and I’d spent much of it listening to Bill’s inspiring stories. For a half century, he’s contributed to expanding the ways that African American music is understood, starting out working with celebrated musical innovators in 1960s London and 1970s New York City and continuing through an extensive career that encompasses music making, community engagement, festival organizing, and academic work. As Taylor Ho Bynum points out, despite all this, Bill has “existed somewhat under the radar, partly because he’s been equally committed to teaching and scholarship throughout his career, and partly because the top-down, star-focused version of jazz history rarely leaves room for the artists in the trenches who are the lifeblood of the music.”1

That night, this “lifeblood” was a large band crammed onto the stage without a spare inch, working through a wide-ranging set of Jason Robinson’s music. “Futures Unimagined,” a piece we played and also part of this album, is typical of Jason’s compositional range and sensibility. It begins with an introduction where the only indication in the score is “collective improvisation – start sparse,” giving the band time for a spacious, internal dialogue that differs wildly each time, but eventually coalesces into more intricate notations and then a blues-inflected song form. There, one lush, recurring melodic phrase is scored for trombone on top of clarinets, an allusion to a specific color and orchestration developed by Duke Ellington in his 1930 composition “Mood Indigo.” As if to heighten the connection, Bill’s brilliant trombone solo on this piece combines throat growling and a harmon mute in his own version of a technique pioneered by Ellington’s trombonist “Tricky” Sam Nanton. Eventually the piece ends with a flourish of improvisational dialogue among two drumset players, George Schuller and Ches Smith, cutting to a sparse snare drum gesture played eight times in perfect unison by both drummers, an elusive and only temporary closure before we continue to the next chapter of the suite.

Almost a century ago, Duke Ellington’s early ensemble music helped establish an important new practice of composing music not only for specific instruments, but also for individual improvisers, drawing on each musician’s personal sound for inspiration and raw material. It’s an approach that has since expanded in infinite directions, especially in African American-based improvised music, but always with a powerful dialectic at its core: It depends on and highlights individuality, and it’s also a deeply collective mode of creativity.

That spirit infuses Resonant Geographies, an extended suite Jason has composed for these eleven improvisers, most of whom have performed in his Janus Ensemble since 2008. Compositionally, the suite is a series of sonic reflections on specific locations that have been important to Jason, each movement a kind of tone poem moving through a range of textures and forms related to that memory. But the suite is just as much animated by musical geographies, both those of the improvisers in this band who bring different relationships to jazz traditions, and those of the composers past and present whose influences echo throughout the score, filtered through Jason’s own compositional sensibility.

Multi-reedist J.D. Parran is another individual who has inspired both Jason and me for many years and brings his unique history to this album. Reflecting on his experience growing up in inner city St. Louis during the 1960s, J.D. describes how he was fortunate to have excellent school music teachers that were part of the “talented tenth group of African American educators.” He comments that these teachers, many of whom had recently migrated from the south, were “very, very special in what they had to go through—in mostly traditionally black colleges and universities—to get their education, and the rigorous kind of training that they received.”2

Rigor: “The quality of being extremely thorough, exhaustive, or accurate.” I associate this quality with Parran himself, one of those rare people I’d describe as a master musician. He’s achieved astonishing technique on multiple reed instruments, including less common ones such as the bass saxophone and alto clarinet, and he’s worked as both an interpreter and an improviser across wide-ranging forms of contemporary music, from his early years with mentors in the Black Artist Group (BAG), an important St. Louis collective, through graduate-level formal training and decades of trans-disciplinary, creative collaborations based in New York City. As an improviser, he’s woven all of these diverse experiences into a “very, very special” sound all his own.

I first heard J.D. in the late 1990s, at a solo concert on which he played several reed instruments. I remember being especially stunned by his interpretation of “St. Louis Blues” on bass clarinet. Thinking back now on his sound, I’m reminded of these words:
“In the context of improvised musics that exhibit strong influences from African- American ways of music-making, musical sound—or rather, ‘one’s own sound’—becomes a carrier for history and cultural identity. As Yusef Lateef maintains, ‘The sound of the improvisation seems to tell us what kind of person is improvising. We feel that we can hear character or personality in the way the musician improvises.’”3 —George E. Lewis4

For this album, one place where Jason features J.D. is on “Dreaming,” the middle movement of the suite. Midway into the piece, J.D. interprets a melody that Jason composed to highlight the unique timbre of the alto clarinet, shifting between gradient inflection and incredible precision of pitch with a rich, fluid tone. He then improvises a solo that slowly blooms across multiple registers and propels the band through a kaleidescopic transformation, interacting especially with the dense, rhythmic composite coming from the two drummers. Here as in many other moments on this album, George and Ches are expert alchemists, constantly discovering new ways to mix their two distinct drumset sounds in a dialogue that grounds the band but is always shifting.

In the final section of “Dreaming,” the ensemble navigates a scored section of tempo shifts and dramatic gestures for low brass and reeds. These two effects together make for another historical citation, as specific as the Ellington one: here the reference is to the second movement of Charles Mingus’ album The Black Saint and the Sinner Lady, a landmark recording in the history of long-form suites composed for improvisers.

Hearing this Mingus trace isn’t necessary for enjoying the track’s explosive ending, but the point is that this model of composition always includes such imaginary dialogues, honoring one’s sources in ways that range from explicit to oblique. And the references aren’t always to the distant past—for example, the hocketed texture scored for two tubas and trombone over a churning rhythm section in “Facing West” points towards the work of contemporary composer Henry Threadgill, whose imaginative bands Jason has cited as a formative influence on the instrumentation of the Janus Ensemble. Here again, Jason’s choice of soloist adds to this connection, as this music launches into an otherworldly solo by virtuoso tubist Marcus Rojas, one of several musicians in this band who has played in Threadgill’s ensembles.

This interweaving of personal and collective histories is a reminder of something important about developing one’s “own sound”: you don’t do it alone. This kind of music requires extensive solitary practice and study, but our sounds as improvisers also evolve through infinite reactions and interactions with others, including the musicians we work with and others we know only through records, like the one you are holding now.

This is Jason’s third recording with the Janus Ensemble, which he has been leading in flexible configurations since 2008. All the musicians on this album have been part of the ensemble since then, except for two new additions on this record, the phenomenal reed player Oscar Noriega and myself on trombone. Though I’m new to the Janus ensemble, Jason and I have been close collaborators and friends for about 20 years, working in numerous bands and projects together. We first met when he moved to San Diego for the same reason I did: to study music with George Lewis and Anthony Davis in a graduate program at UC San Diego

Lewis and Davis radically expanded the questions we were asking about music and inspired us in endless ways. They modeled a creative practice that is rigorous in craft, wide open in creative possibility, and always with a thoughtful, complex and individual connection to the world. They encouraged us to develop our own communities and our own music, not just adopt theirs, but they also introduced us, figuratively and literally, to many other artists who would become important inspirations and mentors, including J.D. Parran and Marty Ehrlich, both on this record.

When I first met Jason, he had been playing on various scenes in northern California and had been mentored by the late Mel Graves, a bassist who ran a vibrant and highly original jazz program at Sonoma State University. Jason was immersed in music with typical intensity, having already released an album of his music on his own label while still in his early 20s. He was inquisitive, deep into the saxophone, creating music with darting, angular lines and exuberant grooves. His music had a driving quality, an optimistic, forward momentum, but always with a sense of openness to shifts in direction, whether subtle or extreme.

I still hear that same musical DNA in Jason’s sound, but deepened through two decades of work and expanded to a broader palette through collaborations like this one. This suite is carefully crafted to feature all of the improvisers in both solo and collective contexts while also covering a wide-ranging compositional terrain. Some sections delve deep into texture and sound, either through detailed score notations that exploit the band’s unusual instrumentation, or through improvisations set within imaginative backdrops. Other stretches of music revel in the rich rhythmic and harmonic language of jazz traditions, sometimes recalling the buoyant energies of early big band music and other times with a more abstract lens that evokes later “creative orchestra” explorations. What ties it all together and makes the work a long-form composition rather than just a sequence of varied parts is the dialogue among these different soundworlds, not just between movements but within them; none of the tracks end where they begin, and each travels unpredictably through a different blend of historical references, individual expressions and sonic explorations.

The band you hear on this record is diverse in generation as well as musical backgrounds, and along with those mentioned above, the lineup includes other equally renowned composer-improvisers. Multi-reedist Marty Ehrlich, like J.D. Parran, began his long history of contributions to this music working with musicians from BAG and the AACM in St. Louis during the late 1960s, and over the decades since has created a wide-ranging body of creative work as a composer and collaborator. The versatile bassist and composer Drew Gress has long been one of the most in-demand improvisers on the NYC scene, grounding bands led by an incredible range of contemporary innovators, and the same can be said of acclaimed guitarist and composer Liberty Ellman, another musician here connected to Henry Threadgill, in Liberty’s case through working closely with Threadgill over many years alongside his own projects.

This band encompasses a fascinating cross-section of jazz-inspired contemporary music scenes, broad and difficult to categorize, but one thread running through the Janus Ensemble and Jason’s music is the idea that this wide range of creative expression and method is central to jazz traditions, and always has been. Many people in the jazz industry still seem eager to reinforce old fault lines and put every new record in a particular box, with avant-garde flavors on one side and “traditional” ones on the other. But music like this embodies a more expansive stance, a recognition that a wide spectrum of expressive possibilities is always present to begin with, endlessly woven into new forms by individuals responding to changing contexts. Speaking in Arthur Taylor’s classic 1972 book of musician-to-musician interviews, the great drummer Philly Joe Jones harshly critiques “bag carriers” who superficially imitate the screams of the avant-garde, but he also cites artists like John Coltrane to distinguish experimentalists who are committed to a deep, integrative craft. In response to a question about “freedom music,” Jones deftly deconstructs conventional discursive boundaries by commenting that “everybody’s been playing free. Every time you play a solo you’re free to play what you want to play. That’s freedom right there.”5 I hope you can enjoy this new music by Jason Robinson and the Janus Ensemble in that spirit. Thanks for listening. — Michael Dessen

Works cited
1. Taylor Ho Bynum, “Guest Post: Taylor Ho Bynum on Bill Lowe,” in Destination: Out, Feb. 1, 2012, accessed June 20, 2017 <http://destination-out.com/?p=3384>.
2. Interview with J.D. Parran by Yusef Jones, accessed June 2017: <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DMYc63l6OMg>.
3. Yusef A. Lateef, “The Pleasures of Voice in Improvised Music,” in Roberta Thelwell, ed., Views on Black American Music: Selected Proceedings from the Fourteenth, Fifteenth, Sixteenth and Seventeenth Annual Black Musicians’ Conferences, University of Massachusetts at Amherst, No. 3 (1985–1988) pp. 43–46.
4. George E. Lewis, “Too Many Notes: Computers, Complexity and Culture in ‘Voyager,’” Leonardo Music Journal, Vol. 10 (2000), pp. 33-39.
5. Art Taylor. Notes and Tones : Musician-to-Musician Interviews. New York: Da Capo Press, 1993, pp. 47-48.
_______________________________________________________
Resonant Geographies is a meditation on place, memory, relationships, and community. Each movement of the suite is inspired by specific places, a canvas of various experiences and memories for me over a number of years. These are not the sounds of places in a narrow sense, but what is contained here might as well be considered a sounding of those places. A subtle but important distinction. A proportion, a relationship, a scent, a feeling. Like the shifting translucent blues and oranges of a rejuvenating and boundless sunset along the north coast of California, or the warm embraces or knowing glances of friends and loved ones, this project is a process. It continues to unfold. Great heartache, struggle, discovery, and rebirth accompanied/s its long stages. My heart smiles again. I hope that you, the listener, find yourself in the sounds contained here. And I hope we are all guided by compassion and empathy as we sound places, relationships, communities.

This album is dedicated to George Finney Thomason.

I’ve been drawn to the ocean for as long as I can remember. Some of my earliest memories are standing on giant rocks extending into the majestic Pacific some four hours north of San Francisco, while staring with amazement at the spray created by crashing waves, enchanted by the patterns of mussels on rocks, the endless volume of water, the mysterious and beckoning horizon. And the smell—salt, seaweed, richly moist, oxygenated air. I feel at home in this wondrous meeting of water, land, and air. I can still see my great grandfather standing on the bluffs, the rocks, the beaches, and hear his voice as he guides and encourages me to explore. What kind of place is the vast, unimaginably large expanse of the ocean? — Jason Robinson

Deepest thanks to my musical collaborators and friends heard on this recording, whose collaborative spirits and finely tuned personal sound approaches make immeasurable contributions to the music. Thanks also to numerous others who helped make this project possible: Mike Marciano, Rich Breen, Jeff Kaiser, Glenn Siegel, Priscilla Page, Matan Rubinstein, Paul Lichter, Eric Lewis, Jim Staley, Jamie Sandel, and my colleagues at Amherst College. And without the love and support of my closest friends and family, none of this would have been possible. Let’s put this on the turntable, Piccolo. It’s about time!

This recording was made possible by the H. Axel Schupf ’57 Fund for Intellectual Life at Amherst College.

pfMENTUM
PFMLP115
www.pfmentum.com

Jason Robinson / Janus Ensemble: Resonant Geographies (PFMCD115)

Jeff Kaiser

[playlist ids="1360"]

PLEASE NOTE: THIS PAGE IS FOR PURCHASING THE CD VERSION.
Click here for the double LP (vinyl)

Resonant Geographies
Jason Robinson

Jason Robinson’s Janus Ensemble:
Jason Robinson—tenor and soprano saxophones, alto flute
JD Parran—alto and contra alto clarinets, bass flute
Oscar Noriega—Bb and bass clarinets, alto saxophone
Marty Ehrlich—bass clarinet, alto saxophone, flute
Michael Dessen—trombone
Bill Lowe—bass trombone, tuba
Marcus Rojas—tuba
Liberty Ellman—guitar
Drew Gress—bass
George Schuller—drums
Ches Smith—drums, glockenspiel

Recorded at Systems Two, Brooklyn, NY, January 5-6, 2016
Engineered and mixed by Mike Marciano
Produced by Jason Robinson
Recording session produced by Steph Robinson
Recording session assistant: Jamie Sandel
Mastered by Rich Breen, Dogmatic Studios, Burbank, CA
All images by David Gloman. Cover, West Worthington Falls, 2016, 17×21 inches, acrylic on paper (detail). Side A label, Bear Den Falls, 2016, 17×22 inches, acrylic on paper (detail). Side B label, Westfield River, 2016, 17×21 inches, acrylic on paper (detail). Side C label, Gold in Brook Falls, 2016, 11×14 inches, acrylic on paper (detail). Side D label, Gunn Brook Falls, 2015, 18×23 inches, acrylic on paper (detail).
Photography by Scott Friedlander, (c) 2016, used with permission
Graphic design by Ted Killian

Track Titles:

Facing East (10:41)
Futures Unimagined (8:12)
Confluence (6:55)
Dreaming (8:24)
Facing West (6:31)
Circuitry Unbound (8:44)
Outcropping (12:14)

All compositions by Jason Robinson (ASCAP)
All rights reserved ℗ and © 2018 Jason Robinson

https://youtu.be/-43JeWvAKRI

Arriving in Montreal in the middle of the Janus Ensemble tour, I watched as my fellow trombonist Bill Lowe wrangled his enormous tuba and bass trombone cases out of the van, through sub-zero winds and icy sidewalks, and into the tiny club where we’d soon perform. This would be a challenge for someone half Bill’s age, but he was unfazed, focused only on warming up all that metal in time for the soundcheck.

We’d been driving all day and I’d spent much of it listening to Bill’s inspiring stories. For a half century, he’s contributed to expanding the ways that African American music is understood, starting out working with celebrated musical innovators in 1960s London and 1970s New York City and continuing through an extensive career that encompasses music making, community engagement, festival organizing, and academic work. As Taylor Ho Bynum points out, despite all this, Bill has “existed somewhat under the radar, partly because he’s been equally committed to teaching and scholarship throughout his career, and partly because the top-down, star-focused version of jazz history rarely leaves room for the artists in the trenches who are the lifeblood of the music.”1

That night, this “lifeblood” was a large band crammed onto the stage without a spare inch, working through a wide-ranging set of Jason Robinson’s music. “Futures Unimagined,” a piece we played and also part of this album, is typical of Jason’s compositional range and sensibility. It begins with an introduction where the only indication in the score is “collective improvisation – start sparse,” giving the band time for a spacious, internal dialogue that differs wildly each time, but eventually coalesces into more intricate notations and then a blues-inflected song form. There, one lush, recurring melodic phrase is scored for trombone on top of clarinets, an allusion to a specific color and orchestration developed by Duke Ellington in his 1930 composition “Mood Indigo.” As if to heighten the connection, Bill’s brilliant trombone solo on this piece combines throat growling and a harmon mute in his own version of a technique pioneered by Ellington’s trombonist “Tricky” Sam Nanton. Eventually the piece ends with a flourish of improvisational dialogue among two drumset players, George Schuller and Ches Smith, cutting to a sparse snare drum gesture played eight times in perfect unison by both drummers, an elusive and only temporary closure before we continue to the next chapter of the suite.

Almost a century ago, Duke Ellington’s early ensemble music helped establish an important new practice of composing music not only for specific instruments, but also for individual improvisers, drawing on each musician’s personal sound for inspiration and raw material. It’s an approach that has since expanded in infinite directions, especially in African American-based improvised music, but always with a powerful dialectic at its core: It depends on and highlights individuality, and it’s also a deeply collective mode of creativity.

That spirit infuses Resonant Geographies, an extended suite Jason has composed for these eleven improvisers, most of whom have performed in his Janus Ensemble since 2008. Compositionally, the suite is a series of sonic reflections on specific locations that have been important to Jason, each movement a kind of tone poem moving through a range of textures and forms related to that memory. But the suite is just as much animated by musical geographies, both those of the improvisers in this band who bring different relationships to jazz traditions, and those of the composers past and present whose influences echo throughout the score, filtered through Jason’s own compositional sensibility.

Multi-reedist J.D. Parran is another individual who has inspired both Jason and me for many years and brings his unique history to this album. Reflecting on his experience growing up in inner city St. Louis during the 1960s, J.D. describes how he was fortunate to have excellent school music teachers that were part of the “talented tenth group of African American educators.” He comments that these teachers, many of whom had recently migrated from the south, were “very, very special in what they had to go through—in mostly traditionally black colleges and universities—to get their education, and the rigorous kind of training that they received.”2

Rigor: “The quality of being extremely thorough, exhaustive, or accurate.” I associate this quality with Parran himself, one of those rare people I’d describe as a master musician. He’s achieved astonishing technique on multiple reed instruments, including less common ones such as the bass saxophone and alto clarinet, and he’s worked as both an interpreter and an improviser across wide-ranging forms of contemporary music, from his early years with mentors in the Black Artist Group (BAG), an important St. Louis collective, through graduate-level formal training and decades of trans-disciplinary, creative collaborations based in New York City. As an improviser, he’s woven all of these diverse experiences into a “very, very special” sound all his own.

I first heard J.D. in the late 1990s, at a solo concert on which he played several reed instruments. I remember being especially stunned by his interpretation of “St. Louis Blues” on bass clarinet. Thinking back now on his sound, I’m reminded of these words:
“In the context of improvised musics that exhibit strong influences from African- American ways of music-making, musical sound—or rather, ‘one’s own sound’—becomes a carrier for history and cultural identity. As Yusef Lateef maintains, ‘The sound of the improvisation seems to tell us what kind of person is improvising. We feel that we can hear character or personality in the way the musician improvises.’”3 —George E. Lewis4

For this album, one place where Jason features J.D. is on “Dreaming,” the middle movement of the suite. Midway into the piece, J.D. interprets a melody that Jason composed to highlight the unique timbre of the alto clarinet, shifting between gradient inflection and incredible precision of pitch with a rich, fluid tone. He then improvises a solo that slowly blooms across multiple registers and propels the band through a kaleidescopic transformation, interacting especially with the dense, rhythmic composite coming from the two drummers. Here as in many other moments on this album, George and Ches are expert alchemists, constantly discovering new ways to mix their two distinct drumset sounds in a dialogue that grounds the band but is always shifting.

In the final section of “Dreaming,” the ensemble navigates a scored section of tempo shifts and dramatic gestures for low brass and reeds. These two effects together make for another historical citation, as specific as the Ellington one: here the reference is to the second movement of Charles Mingus’ album The Black Saint and the Sinner Lady, a landmark recording in the history of long-form suites composed for improvisers.

Hearing this Mingus trace isn’t necessary for enjoying the track’s explosive ending, but the point is that this model of composition always includes such imaginary dialogues, honoring one’s sources in ways that range from explicit to oblique. And the references aren’t always to the distant past—for example, the hocketed texture scored for two tubas and trombone over a churning rhythm section in “Facing West” points towards the work of contemporary composer Henry Threadgill, whose imaginative bands Jason has cited as a formative influence on the instrumentation of the Janus Ensemble. Here again, Jason’s choice of soloist adds to this connection, as this music launches into an otherworldly solo by virtuoso tubist Marcus Rojas, one of several musicians in this band who has played in Threadgill’s ensembles.

This interweaving of personal and collective histories is a reminder of something important about developing one’s “own sound”: you don’t do it alone. This kind of music requires extensive solitary practice and study, but our sounds as improvisers also evolve through infinite reactions and interactions with others, including the musicians we work with and others we know only through records, like the one you are holding now.

This is Jason’s third recording with the Janus Ensemble, which he has been leading in flexible configurations since 2008. All the musicians on this album have been part of the ensemble since then, except for two new additions on this record, the phenomenal reed player Oscar Noriega and myself on trombone. Though I’m new to the Janus ensemble, Jason and I have been close collaborators and friends for about 20 years, working in numerous bands and projects together. We first met when he moved to San Diego for the same reason I did: to study music with George Lewis and Anthony Davis in a graduate program at UC San Diego

Lewis and Davis radically expanded the questions we were asking about music and inspired us in endless ways. They modeled a creative practice that is rigorous in craft, wide open in creative possibility, and always with a thoughtful, complex and individual connection to the world. They encouraged us to develop our own communities and our own music, not just adopt theirs, but they also introduced us, figuratively and literally, to many other artists who would become important inspirations and mentors, including J.D. Parran and Marty Ehrlich, both on this record.

When I first met Jason, he had been playing on various scenes in northern California and had been mentored by the late Mel Graves, a bassist who ran a vibrant and highly original jazz program at Sonoma State University. Jason was immersed in music with typical intensity, having already released an album of his music on his own label while still in his early 20s. He was inquisitive, deep into the saxophone, creating music with darting, angular lines and exuberant grooves. His music had a driving quality, an optimistic, forward momentum, but always with a sense of openness to shifts in direction, whether subtle or extreme.

I still hear that same musical DNA in Jason’s sound, but deepened through two decades of work and expanded to a broader palette through collaborations like this one. This suite is carefully crafted to feature all of the improvisers in both solo and collective contexts while also covering a wide-ranging compositional terrain. Some sections delve deep into texture and sound, either through detailed score notations that exploit the band’s unusual instrumentation, or through improvisations set within imaginative backdrops. Other stretches of music revel in the rich rhythmic and harmonic language of jazz traditions, sometimes recalling the buoyant energies of early big band music and other times with a more abstract lens that evokes later “creative orchestra” explorations. What ties it all together and makes the work a long-form composition rather than just a sequence of varied parts is the dialogue among these different soundworlds, not just between movements but within them; none of the tracks end where they begin, and each travels unpredictably through a different blend of historical references, individual expressions and sonic explorations.

The band you hear on this record is diverse in generation as well as musical backgrounds, and along with those mentioned above, the lineup includes other equally renowned composer-improvisers. Multi-reedist Marty Ehrlich, like J.D. Parran, began his long history of contributions to this music working with musicians from BAG and the AACM in St. Louis during the late 1960s, and over the decades since has created a wide-ranging body of creative work as a composer and collaborator. The versatile bassist and composer Drew Gress has long been one of the most in-demand improvisers on the NYC scene, grounding bands led by an incredible range of contemporary innovators, and the same can be said of acclaimed guitarist and composer Liberty Ellman, another musician here connected to Henry Threadgill, in Liberty’s case through working closely with Threadgill over many years alongside his own projects.

This band encompasses a fascinating cross-section of jazz-inspired contemporary music scenes, broad and difficult to categorize, but one thread running through the Janus Ensemble and Jason’s music is the idea that this wide range of creative expression and method is central to jazz traditions, and always has been. Many people in the jazz industry still seem eager to reinforce old fault lines and put every new record in a particular box, with avant-garde flavors on one side and “traditional” ones on the other. But music like this embodies a more expansive stance, a recognition that a wide spectrum of expressive possibilities is always present to begin with, endlessly woven into new forms by individuals responding to changing contexts. Speaking in Arthur Taylor’s classic 1972 book of musician-to-musician interviews, the great drummer Philly Joe Jones harshly critiques “bag carriers” who superficially imitate the screams of the avant-garde, but he also cites artists like John Coltrane to distinguish experimentalists who are committed to a deep, integrative craft. In response to a question about “freedom music,” Jones deftly deconstructs conventional discursive boundaries by commenting that “everybody’s been playing free. Every time you play a solo you’re free to play what you want to play. That’s freedom right there.”5 I hope you can enjoy this new music by Jason Robinson and the Janus Ensemble in that spirit. Thanks for listening. — Michael Dessen

Works cited
1. Taylor Ho Bynum, “Guest Post: Taylor Ho Bynum on Bill Lowe,” in Destination: Out, Feb. 1, 2012, accessed June 20, 2017 <http://destination-out.com/?p=3384>.
2. Interview with J.D. Parran by Yusef Jones, accessed June 2017: <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DMYc63l6OMg>.
3. Yusef A. Lateef, “The Pleasures of Voice in Improvised Music,” in Roberta Thelwell, ed., Views on Black American Music: Selected Proceedings from the Fourteenth, Fifteenth, Sixteenth and Seventeenth Annual Black Musicians’ Conferences, University of Massachusetts at Amherst, No. 3 (1985–1988) pp. 43–46.
4. George E. Lewis, “Too Many Notes: Computers, Complexity and Culture in ‘Voyager,’” Leonardo Music Journal, Vol. 10 (2000), pp. 33-39.
5. Art Taylor. Notes and Tones : Musician-to-Musician Interviews. New York: Da Capo Press, 1993, pp. 47-48.
_______________________________________________________
Resonant Geographies is a meditation on place, memory, relationships, and community. Each movement of the suite is inspired by specific places, a canvas of various experiences and memories for me over a number of years. These are not the sounds of places in a narrow sense, but what is contained here might as well be considered a sounding of those places. A subtle but important distinction. A proportion, a relationship, a scent, a feeling. Like the shifting translucent blues and oranges of a rejuvenating and boundless sunset along the north coast of California, or the warm embraces or knowing glances of friends and loved ones, this project is a process. It continues to unfold. Great heartache, struggle, discovery, and rebirth accompanied/s its long stages. My heart smiles again. I hope that you, the listener, find yourself in the sounds contained here. And I hope we are all guided by compassion and empathy as we sound places, relationships, communities.

This album is dedicated to George Finney Thomason.

I’ve been drawn to the ocean for as long as I can remember. Some of my earliest memories are standing on giant rocks extending into the majestic Pacific some four hours north of San Francisco, while staring with amazement at the spray created by crashing waves, enchanted by the patterns of mussels on rocks, the endless volume of water, the mysterious and beckoning horizon. And the smell—salt, seaweed, richly moist, oxygenated air. I feel at home in this wondrous meeting of water, land, and air. I can still see my great grandfather standing on the bluffs, the rocks, the beaches, and hear his voice as he guides and encourages me to explore. What kind of place is the vast, unimaginably large expanse of the ocean? — Jason Robinson

Deepest thanks to my musical collaborators and friends heard on this recording, whose collaborative spirits and finely tuned personal sound approaches make immeasurable contributions to the music. Thanks also to numerous others who helped make this project possible: Mike Marciano, Rich Breen, Jeff Kaiser, Glenn Siegel, Priscilla Page, Matan Rubinstein, Paul Lichter, Eric Lewis, Jim Staley, Jamie Sandel, and my colleagues at Amherst College. And without the love and support of my closest friends and family, none of this would have been possible. Let’s put this on the turntable, Piccolo. It’s about time!

This recording was made possible by the H. Axel Schupf ’57 Fund for Intellectual Life at Amherst College.

pfMENTUM
PFMCD115
www.pfmentum.com

Matty Harris Double Septet (PFMLP093)

Jeff Kaiser

[This is page is for ordering the VINYL VERSION.]

[playlist ids="969"]

Matty Harris Double Septet

Side A

1) Party Time 11:19

2) 10,000 Kimmys Gibbler 06:48

Side B

3) Cockapoo Army 08:37

4) Oh, A Little Day Trip Around the Crunch 08:54

Personnel:

Soprano and straight alto saxophones, contra-alto clarinet: Vinny Golia

Soprano, straight tenor and sopranino saxophones, bass clarinet: Matty Harris

Soprano saxophone: Paul Novros

Soprano and baritone saxophone: Ryan Parrish

Soprano and sopranino saxophones, piccolo: Joe Santa Maria

Trumpets: Louis Lopez, Brandon Sherman, Greg Zilboorg

Drum Sets: Tim Carr, Michael Lockwood

Contrabasses: Nathan Phelps, Jake Rosenzweig

Fender Rhodes: Garret Grow

Baritone Guitar: Maxwell Gualtieri
Recorded January 14, 2015 by John Baffa and Todd Hannigan at Brotheryn Studios in Ojai, CA

Mixed January – June 2015 by John Baffa at TV Tray Studios in Ventura, CA
Mastered July 16 2015 by Ron McMaster at Capitol Studios in Hollywood, CA

Produced by Maxwell Gualtieri

Graphic Design by Jacob Halpern

PFMCD093

Matty Harris Double Septet (PFMCD093)

Jeff Kaiser

[This is page is for ordering the CD.]

[playlist ids="969"]

Matty Harris Double Septet

Side A

1) Party Time 11:19

2) 10,000 Kimmys Gibbler 06:48

Side B

3) Cockapoo Army 08:37

4) Oh, A Little Day Trip Around the Crunch 08:54

Personnel:

Soprano and straight alto saxophones, contra-alto clarinet: Vinny Golia

Soprano, straight tenor and sopranino saxophones, bass clarinet: Matty Harris

Soprano saxophone: Paul Novros

Soprano and baritone saxophone: Ryan Parrish

Soprano and sopranino saxophones, piccolo: Joe Santa Maria

Trumpets: Louis Lopez, Brandon Sherman, Greg Zilboorg

Drum Sets: Tim Carr, Michael Lockwood

Contrabasses: Nathan Phelps, Jake Rosenzweig

Fender Rhodes: Garret Grow

Baritone Guitar: Maxwell Gualtieri
Recorded January 14, 2015 by John Baffa and Todd Hannigan at Brotheryn Studios in Ojai, CA

Mixed January – June 2015 by John Baffa at TV Tray Studios in Ventura, CA
Mastered July 16 2015 by Ron McMaster at Capitol Studios in Hollywood, CA

Produced by Maxwell Gualtieri

Graphic Design by Jacob Halpern

PFMCD093

Michael Vlatkovich and Dottie Grossman: Call & Response & Friends (PFMCD060)

Jeff Kaiser

[playlist ids="501,503"]
Artists: Los Angeles Recording:
Dottie Grossman: poems
Michael Vlatkovich: trombone
Rich West: drums/percussion
Anders Swanson: bass

L.A. Recording 7/09: Killzone Studio, Los Angeles, CA

Corvallis Recording (indicated by *) 11/05:
Dottie Grossman, poems; Michael Vlatkovich, trombone;
David Storrs, drums/ percussion, toys; Jim Knodle, trumpet

Corvallis Recording: Califas Studio, Corvallis, OR

engineer: Wayne Peet
producers: Michael Vlatkovich, Dottie Grossman
front cover art: Billy Mintz
design: Ted Killian

1. Benjamin Called (1:38)
2. I Wish (1:49)
3. Tumbleweed (:57)*
4. Early Wednesday morning (1:20)*
5. Veterans Hospital (1:18)*
6. Mendocino Coast 1967 (2:21)
7. Merry Christmas, Michael (1:12)*
8. Two Henny Youngman Poems (1:57)
9. This Winter (1:38)
10. Two Appropriations (1:39)*
11. The Two Times I Loved
You The Most In a Car (2:37)
12. Two Poems About Trucks (2:20)
13. Africa (1:29)*
14. Melting Pot (2:35)
15. Zoey Steps Out (1:18)*
16. Quotation (1:56)
17.Little Rock (2:03)*
18.Two More Henny
Youngman Poems (1:48)
19. Helicopter Noise (:50)*
20. This Is What I Do Best (1:33)
21. The People Who Hate Wind (1:22)*
22. Just Before (1:45)
23. Noon Concert (1:36)
24. Another Nose Poem (1:52)*
25. Definition of Happiness/
If I Were Directing This Movie (1:27)*
26. From Iceland (1:36)*
27. Alaska (1:49)
28. What Henny Youngman Loves
Most About America (:47)
29. Vince Salvino (1.16)*
30. Fortune Cookie (3:11)
31. Henny Youngman’s True
Confession (2:06)*
32. Sorry To Disappoint You (1:39)
33. Future Past (1:42)
34. Mark Weber-Type Poem (1:41)

Track 1

Benjamin called
from Long Beach Island,
New Jersey.
I said, “I can hardly hear you;
the ocean’s so noisy.”
He put down the phone
for a second
and screamed,
“Atlantic, will you please
shut up? —
I’m talking to Dottie.”

Track 2

I wish there was a town
called Nirvana
in Nevada.
It would be
a beautiful place,
in a valley,
where the only industry
was happiness.
Wouldn’t it be fun
to send a letter there —
addressed to
“Nirvana, NV”?

Track 3

Something is draped on a fence
until it is time to be tumbleweed.
In this room,
you are heroic,
tasting of summer and vitamins.
Step outside
and the tumbleweed rolls.

Track 4

Early Wednesday morning,
nobody’s kicked up any dust,
nobody’s made a dime, yet.
All the pet dogs
have left-alone faces.

Track 5

Veterans Hospital

The uniform white buildings
shine as pointlessly
as dead men’s teeth.
Here, everything is slower,
even southern,
as they dance to mark
the time between the palm trees
and forget in the clean cut grass.

Track 6

Mendocino Coast, 1967

Inland, where the grasses and grapes lived,
we could not have imagined
the rocks, the cold clouds —
the surf that would surround us
like a headache,
and those long tubes of kelp
like noodles
from another world
where, with the music of foghorns
and wind chimes,
even the kind moon
seemed dangerous.

Track 7

Merry Christmas, Michael

You remind me of a dolphin,
navigating the waves
with your own mysterious sonar
that sounds a lot like a trombone.

Track 8

2 Henny Youngman Poems

Henny Youngman On National Poetry Month

Henny Youngman hates National Poetry Month;
it gives him performance anxiety.

Henny Youngman To His Priest

Forgive me, Father,
for I have sinned.
I’m sexually aroused
by sacred music.

Track 9

This winter feels colder than ever,
or maybe I’m just more sensitive
these days,
when the wind is
a fire engine
and the moon is sinister
and blue.
I’m all bundled up for it,
stamping my feet,
drinking rum,
counting the days
until the yellow flowers.

Track 10

(two appropriations)

Tuna Fishing

“A March 22 “Outdoors” article
about tuna fishing
inadvertently identified an angler
as Rusty Johnson.
His name is Frosty Johnson.”

The Rhythm of Commercials On The Discovery Health Channel

Will a new nose help Wendy
rediscover her self esteem?

Track 11

The Two Times I Loved You the Most In A Car

It was your idea
to park and watch the elephants
swaying among the trees
like royalty
at that make-believe safari
near Laguna.
I didn’t know anything that big
could be so quiet.

And once, you stopped
on a dark desert road,
to show me the stars
climbing over each other
riotously
like insects;
like an orchestra
thrashing its way
through time itself.
I never saw light that way
again.

Track 12

Convoy

Tonight on the road,
the trucks are majestic;
they sashay like elephants
through the turns,
with jewels on their heads
and tails.

Night Convoy

The trucks are wearing rubies in their hair.
They are like beautiful movie stars,
walking carefully in high heeled shoes,
making whooshing noises in the dark.

Track 13

Africa:
its vowels are so seductive,
I get dizzy.
I’ve no wish to deplete
the wildebeest,
I only wish to eat the wildebeest.
Last year’s skeleton crop
set a new record.
The air is succulent
with lions and mahogany.

Track 14

We were sitting around the melting pot
(which is what I call my hairdresser’s):
a Korean, a Vietnamese, and myself (the American)
discussing our homelands calmly
like three women anywhere,
with no mention of bloodshed or memories.
I told them I’d been reading
about Angor Wat
and the Cambodian jungles
where heartless nature
buried the ancient temples
and we all agreed
that could never happen here
in Santa Monica.

Track 15

At eight months old,
Zoey steps out,
wearing a new tooth
and a rose
in her purple hat.

Track 16

“I don’t own an exquisite way to move around in the night.”

Doug Benezra, 9/18/05

It occurs to me that,
when I die,
they might find the necklace
I dropped behind the bed
and wonder
how long it was there,
and whether I’d missed it.
But will they care
about my favorite color,
my long-range plans,
or my habit of searching myself
for signs of rust?

Track 17

“The town has several antique shops and fruit stands, in addition to restaurants and gas stations.“
…from the Little Rock, CA website.

Little Rock

No, not that one —
This one’s in the desert,
about a two hour drive from here
It’s the color of western movies
(blue skies, brown horses).
There’s even a mirage —
rare water and
big Medjool dates,
a fruit stand in the uncomplaining dust
on the way to Valyermo,
to Saint Andrew’s Abbey,
where the dead monks sleep
in the tight-packed earth
of The Holy Land
off the main road.

Track 18

Henny Youngman doesn’t understand
why camping is not permitted
on the cemetery plot
he just paid for.

Henny Youngman On National Public Radio

Once again, I made it through the pledge drive
without contributing a dime.

Track 19

When I remember
how quiet you used to be,
the helicopter noise
in my head
disappears.

Track 20

This is what I do best:
I phone you
and say Congratulations,
Merry Christmas, Happy Birthday,
Happy New Year,
How’s your sister?
Are you better?
Is it hot enough for you?
Thanks, I love you, too.

Track 21

The people who hate wind
are insulated, inland;
they wear hats to keep them safe
from
flying poems.

Track 22

Just before I killed that bug,
I had the guilty thought
that it might be you, reincarnated,
but I told myself that,
if you did return,
it would be as a much higher life-form,
maybe a hummingbird.

Track 23

Noon Concert

These frail, white widows
who get their hair done weekly
in tight curls,
like little flowers
bend their heads
until the applause
says it’s time
to be brave, again.

Track 24

If the bridge of the nose
is really the seat of wisdom,
yours is The Britannica,
edited by Einstein,
illustrated by Picasso.

Track 25

Definition of Happiness #302

Yellow plates on a black table,
and my new curtains,
dancing a tango
in the open window.

If I were directing this movie,
we’d be walking through clouds
wet as dogs’ breath.
Just a dot of pink, for excitement,
and no music, just ice where the wind was.

Track 26

Since she was from Iceland
and didn’t know any better,
she said, “I miss the green of the east.
It’s so yellow here.
Of course, at home, we don’t have any trees.
Once, in New Jersey, I could see Manhattan
across the river,
as if it was a picture of Manhattan.”

Track 27

Alaska

Once, I got into a taxi
whose driver wore a turban.
We chatted about traffic and travel
and he said he absolutely loved Alaska,
where he’d worked on the pipeline for five years.
He blushed when he told me, “You know,
I’m a Muslim. We’re supposed to pray
five times a day, facing Mecca.
But sometimes, when nobody’s watching,
I face Alaska.”

Track 28

What Henny Youngman
loves most about America
is that anybody can
grow up to be the Pope.

Track 29

We were all sitting around,
talking about what kind of animal
we’d like to be,
and Vince said, “A gorilla,
because they’re the most like us.”

Track 30

Fortune Cookie

You are going to look exactly
like your father —
one of those draped,
semi-ecstatic old Jews
you see framed
on the mantel
in grandmothers’ houses.
Like him,
you will lapse into Yiddish,
throwing your hands up
in mock surrender.
And your lips will move
when you read,
and your children will
imitate you.

Track 31

Henny Youngman’s True Confession
(thanks to M.B.)

I think that, if I were to talk to a rabbi,
he’d listen and all,
but then we’d just end up
with him asking me
to explain the Internet.
I went to a palm reader,
said, “I’m in love with a straight guy
who can’t love me back.”
She said, “Why would you
want to do that?”
I’m, like, exiled,
all the best people are.

Track 32

Sorry To Disappoint You

As the elder in your Chinese house,
I have almost no wisdom to offer:
A few books, a few poems –
I’m not sure there’s anything else,
except that I once shook John Coltrane’s hand,
and sex in the morning is more fun
than cereal.
The rest you already know.

Track 33

Future Past

If I had stayed asleep
I would have missed
the fun of speaking English,
the quiet satisfaction
of appointments kept,
the way dreams change
when you try to describe them.

Track 34

Mark Weber-Type Poem

So my latest rejection comes from Iowa,
about a week before Christmas:
“Thank you for allowing us
to consider your work…”
I picture the writer
at a desk overlooking a corn field.
There’s a droopy plant
on the windowsill
and a volume of Yeats or Keats
nearby.
It has been a tough day,
and here I come,
galloping into that landscape
with my palm trees and deserts,
coyotes and surfers.

pfMENTUM CD060

PFMCD060

Steuart Liebig / Tee-Tot Quartet: Always Outnumbered (PFMCD053)

Jeff Kaiser

[playlist ids="473,475"]
Steuart Liebig/Tee-Tot Quartet

Joseph Berardi: drumset, percussion
Dan Clucas: cornet
Scot Ray: dobro
Steuart Liebig: contrabassguitar

Tracks

07-04-00 4:58
serenade 5:06
wrong how long 4:00
stutterstep 4:26
fearless 7:49
clean, shaved and sober 3:52
bobtail 1:54
cooked and chopped 3:15
chucktown 4:17
mercy kitchen 7:26
sunshine candy 4:24
barrelfoot grind 4:26
lonewolf 4:28

© 2008 steuart liebig/
sisong music (ascap)
www.stigsite.com

artwork and layout by Steuart Liebig
cover photos by Scot Ray
band photos by Tee-Tot Quartet
recorded by Wayne Peet, assisted by Aaron Druckman, at Newzone Studio, Los Angeles, 19–20 May 2007
mixed by Wayne Peet and Steuart Liebig, July–August 2007
Steuart Liebig uses Fodera basses and Fodera roundwound strings, the Raven Labs PMB-1 and pickups by Rick Turner
Joe Berardi uses Paiste cymbals and attack drums heads
big thanks to Tee-Tot, Wayne Peet, Jeff Kaiser, and Leslie Rosdol, Anya Liebig and Aron Liebig

Always Outnumbered

. . . is an unholy transfiguration of the jazz and blues canon—a perverted translation of the sacred 78s of Chicago jazz and blues circa 1920–1950 into a more sinister modern dialect. On the opening track, 07-04-00, you can hear some noxious sonic concoction brewing, an aural hormetic designed to make you stronger if you can survive the cocktail.

Tee-Tot are expatriate pioneers that flew a few light-years past Europe and landed in a neighboring multiverse with fewer happy endings. These four veterans of the Los Angeles new music scene bring something completely different to each tune, different from the last tune and different from anything you normally hear on their respective instruments.

Joe Berardi is a medium for myriad gods of groove. He’s a maniacal Baby Dodds wielding his contraption for the dark side on Sunshine Candy, an angry Fred Below demonstrating primal scream therapy through the art of the shuffle on Chucktown and on Serenade he’s a fallen military snare player tapping ‘help me die’ in Morse code in vain.

Steuart Liebig constructs wide melodic avenues through the hostile landscapes of convoluted tunes like Wrong How Long. As heard on Cooked and Chopped he uses compelling melodies to drive the band from beneath instead of walking the well-worn footpaths of predictable chord progressions. He reinvents the bass role as an interactive melodic instrument in contrast to the bebop obsession of “chasing a melodic rat around a harmonic maze.” He’s also comfortable playing little or nothing at all for large patches, as on Fearless, an oblique tribute to Mingus—a “Goodbye Pork Pie Hat” for a lost and dispirited Lester Young.

Dan Clucas channels a deranged Cootie Williams, commands a gaggle of nuclear geese and employs various subsonic pitches possibly responsible for climate change. He employs all manner of ornamentation and virtual pedals from a very ill-mannered velar growl to a vibrato that would have made Clara Rockmore nervous. On Clean, Shaved and Sober, he celebrates the decline of a late-stage Bix Beiderbecke suffering from years of poor-grade Prohibition-era alcohol.

Scot Ray possesses a wide arsenal of portamento that would make any carnatic pandit blush. A seemingly infinite variety of sounds come out of his dobro’s resonator, from distressed ermine lamentations to the wailing of the damned. Considering today’s totalitarian atmosphere, Scot’s frenetic picking, rubbery phrasing and anxiety-provoking note choices on Stutterstep alone should earn him a place on a government list. Somewhere in hell an unfortunate freshman soul attempts to decipher his solo on Barrelfoot Grind.

Contemporary jazz and blues music lies wasting in a gurney of predictable mimicry, its circulation gone sluggish, its pulse nearly arrested as it grows more necrotic by the year. Tee-Tot debrides the bed sores of the sedentary modern roots scene.

Steuart has more than a few bands. They are all distinct from one another, draw from disparate sources and are all degenerate—in the best sense of the word. The dozen or so albums from these groups have explored everything from Muddy Waters to Anton Webern. There’s never a shortage of great melodies or superb improvisation, and this disc is no exception.

–Bill Barrett, Los Ageles, January 2008

pfMENTUM CD053

PFMCD053