Emily Hay / Brad Dutz / Wayne Peet (PFMCD043)

Jeff Kaiser 1 Comment

[playlist ids="452"]
Emily Hay: Flute, Alto Flute, Vocals, Fx
Wayne Peet: Piano, Organ, Theremin
Brad Dutz: Percussion

Recorded 04-02-05
Edited 06-06-05
Mixed And Mastered 02-04-06
Newzone Sudio, Los Angeles
Wayne Peet, Engineer

Cover Painting By Kaoru: Untitled #61
Graphic Assistance: Ted Killian
Record Executive: Jeff Kaiser
Brad thanks: Yamaha, Vic Firth, Paiste, Factory Metal Percussion, Remo, Roland

#1. Bean Dip 5:57
#2. Filthy Washer 5:08
#3. It Can Be Thick 5:03
#4. Metamorphasize 9:43
#5. Coming! 8:17
#6. Hot Japanese Water 4:44
#7. Amnesia Dealer 8:26
#8. A Lotta T’s 6:35
#9. Possum 12:27

© Emily Hay, Emily Hay Music, BMI
© Brad Dutz, Leaky Spleen Music, BMI
© Wayne Peet, Killzone Music, BMI

pfMENTUM CD043

PFMCD043

Wayne Peet Quartet: Live at Al’s Bar (PFMCD027)

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[playlist ids="416"]
Wayne Peet: Organ, Organ Bass
Russell Bizzett: Drums
Nels Cline: Guitar – Left
G.E. Stinson: Guitar, Mangled Recordings – Right

1. Five Swirls (15:21)

a. Swirl [starts at] 0:00
b. Big Lumps 5:19
c. Soft Foot 6:57
d. Another Room 12:00
e. Points 13:15

2. Five Doors (16:35)

a. Creepsville 0:00
b. Mellow 3:12
c. Surges 7:18
d. Driving Time 10:51
e. Cross Stick Coda 14:19

3. Inner Funkdom (11:29)
total playing time (43:32)

Five Swirls and Five Doors by Peet, Cline, Stinson, Bizzett • Inner Funkdom by Wayne Peet
® and © 1999 Killzone Music, BMI • Drawings by Ellington Peet • Design/Layout by Jeff Kaiser
Recorded live at Al’s Bar, Los Angeles, 4.27.99 • Jim Watson and Wayne Peet – Engineers
Mixed and mastered at Newzone Studio by Wayne Peet, Los Angeles, May 2003

pfMENTUM CD027

PFMCD027

New Director of Development, THREE new recordings, and an intern

Lot’s of news! ———————————————————— In this issue: * New Director of Development: Andrew Pask! * New recordings by: + The Glen Whitehead Trio + Andrew Raffo Dewar / John Hughes / Chad Popple + Guerino Mazzola and Heinz Geisser * AND…introducing our first ever intern: Nick Welch! ———————————————————— We are thrilled to announce that Andrew Pask is coming on board …

Glen Whitehead Trio: The Living Daylights (PFMCD125)

Jeff Kaiser Leave a Comment

[playlist ids="1553"]

Glen Whitehead Trio

The Living Daylights

Britton Ciampa Drums • Scott Walton Bass • Glen Whitehead Trumpet

Improvisational structures inspired by natural phenomena that play with our perceptions of space, time, and place

The Living Daylights Suite (1-3)
1. Living Daylights Suite 1—at Time’s Place 05:02
2. Living Daylights Suite 2—Zenosyne 08:23
3. Living Daylights Suite 3—Apophenia 08:30
4. Heliopause 04:01
5. 42 Degrees 04:31
6. Bow Shock 05:49
7. Shedding Vortices 03:38
8. Involution Engine 06:22
9. Fissure Syndrome 03:54
10. Pearl of Swirl 05:50
11. Punktuation 07:44

Recorded at the Banquet Studios February 6, 2016
and July 21, 2016, Guerneville, CA
Engineered by Darryl Webb
Mixed and Mastered by Wayne Peet at Killzone,
Newzone Studio, Los Angeles, February, 2018
Photo Credit—Glen Whitehead
Graphic Design—Ted Killian
© 2018 Glen Whitehead (ASCAP)
pfMENTUM
PFMCD125

The Living Daylights
Composition Notes

The Living Daylights is based on concepts extracted from natural phenomena (most chosen, some imagined) that play with our perceptions of space, time and place, and rendered with improvisational frameworks constructed to enable many possibilities within the natural restraints of a conscious system.

These ideas were generated from my experiences exploring a range of natural environments over the last several years through my engagement with ecoacoustics and other research pursuits in immersive acoustic explorations across many different environments. These experiences are part of a broad interdisciplinary leap (on my part) as an attempt to find more passage between creative music practices and fields of acoustic ecology and ecoacoustics.  I see these fields as intimately intertwined. There are a host of people and organizations building new canons and research areas such as the Deep Listening Institute, the EcoSono Institute, and other related movements and organizations.  As my time in the field clocked more hours and locations – including many sites across Colorado and the great southwest, Alaska, Cape Cod, the Pacific southwest, Mexico, Australia, Tasmania, New Zealand, Korea and more, I have become increasingly aware of the similarities between immersive activities surrounding intensive environmental participation, usually involving field recording scenarios and improvised music-making. The more one invests energy, time and intention to such immersive experiences in the world– the more phenomenal events occur – the world opens up to you. As in improvisation in theatre – the world says “yes.”  Connections come alive, mysterious interactions occur.

These works, and the two incredible musicians whom I have been so honored to work with on this project reflect such phenomenological experiences.  Scott Walton (acoustic bass) has been a key collaborator in my musical life, as equal a pianist as a bassist, he is a long-time colleague and simply one of the best musicians – as an inventive improviser, listener and performer – that I have had the privilege to learn from. Britt, to me, represents a younger, up and coming generation of insanely informed musicians.  His skill as a drummer and knowledge as musician is well beyond his years.  He possesses an uncanny ability to connect obscure subjects and histories within a deep understanding of the creative music world.  The magic of his playing is his ability to wield musical and sonic information into its the fullest possible context.  He’s also an “ex-student” of mine from UCCS – one of our very best.
An ensemble is an ecosystem with each member defining the community. In this “conscious system” individuals are free to roam and explore, while also being responsible for the whole – empathy is essential to create both meaning and form.  Self-reflection between the rewards of individuality and seeking shared common good creates prime musical real estate.  The thoughts and intentions of one person are internalized (and externalized) by the other members.

I view the wide world of sonic and musical languages in this work as idiomatic – a respectful departure of what is usually commonly understood in contexts of free improvisation as “non-idiomatic” (from Derek Bailey’s definition).  To me, this is a resolvable contradiction.  Our language is saturated within the idioms of our instrumental backgrounds – acquired ear, technical and historic knowledge along with both innate and environmental influences.  How we wield our musical instruments is a fundamental part of our cultural “taskscapes,” a term used by Tim Ingold, originally “to bring the perspectives of archaeology and anthropology into unison” (The Temporality of the Landscape, 1993), “the constitutive tasks of the dwelling” that applies perfectly to instrumental and vocal play

 

Notes on the Tracks

The first three tracks make up a suite.  They were the first pieces recorded on this project, conceived and recorded as one unit, and in one take.  At Time’s Place is a play on words – we only ever really sense the presence.  In this open-ended tradition of improvised music, the phenomenological act of real-time musical creation gives us a unique way to access the past and the future, simultaneously.

Zenosyne, from the unique “Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows” by John Greene pinpoints a fundamental experience that had no clear term (in English, anyway) – the sense that time keeps going faster.  Such an example is at the very core of improvisational experience, and I like to imagine would be part of a future established aspect of music theory for improvisation.  I am reminded of many times when an improvisation seemed to take ten minutes, and forty-five minutes had passed.

Apophenia, the perception of patterns, meanings, or connections where none exists, is also a relatively new word although the well explored phenomenon itself is not. Its first use is credited to the psychiatrist Klaus Conrad back in 1958 in his catchy-titled Die beginnende Schizophrenie: Versuch einer Gestaltanalyse des Wahns, which translates to the equally scintillating The origins of schizophrenia: A Gestalt analysis of paranoia.  It is fascinating that this word should appear to be so recent when the actual phenomenon is so old and important enough to have been a lynch-pin for philosophical study through the ages.  In Natural History of Religion (1757), philosopher David Hume (1711-1776) wrote the following:

There is a universal tendency among mankind to conceive all beings like themselves, and to transfer to every object those qualities with which they are familiarly acquainted, and of which they are intimately conscious.  We find human faces in the moon, armies in the clouds; and by a natural propensity, if not corrected by experience and reflection, ascribe malice and good will to everything that hurts or pleases us.

There is one major qualification and difference of how this idea is utilized in this work.  This is a play on the imagination – the “random” discoveries that appear to have no connections, actually uncover true, previously unseen connections and relationships.  I cannot think of a better context for the illusively connective experience of improvised music.

The Heliopause (with its syntactic musical resonance) is the boundary where the sun’s solar wind meets the faint radiation of interstellar space and is no longer strong enough to push back the stellar winds of the surrounding stars.  This is the boundary where the interstellar medium and solar wind pressures meet and balance – physics working on a grand scale. Imagine, even with this distance impossible for us to quantify in scale in our imagination, that this line is definitive and slender where the distant finger of our incubator solar cocoon touches the rest of the universe– what a musical thought.

42 degrees references the connection of people and light reflected in the observations of – rainbows.  When we see a rainbow and its band of colors we are looking at light refracted and reflected from different raindrops at an angle of between 40 and 42 degrees at all points of view – whether one person is high on a hilltop and another hundreds of feet below.  Light orients to our visual lenses, our lenses orient the angle of light.

Bow Shock, also called a detached shock or normal shock, is a curved, stationary shock wave that is found in a supersonic flow past a finite body.  Shedding vortices (vortex shedding) is an oscillating flow that takes place when a fluid such as air or water flows past a bluff (as opposed to streamlined) body at certain velocities, depending on the size and shape of the body. Both of these phenomena, for me, connect with the wind “shock” that occurs inside and across a fast material with wind and brass sound production, and illuminate the use of creating sound vortexes in so many different ways in improvised music.

Involution Engine is a function, transformation, or operator that is equal to its inverse, only applies to itself and is a function of its own inverse. for instance, in medicine, this applies to the shrinking of an organ (such as the uterus after pregnancy) or philosophy and psychology a “turning in” on one’s self.  Musical phenomena in time also have similar phenomena but have been limited in concept, I believe, because of the hard-cast association with printed, scored notation – retrograde inversion, for example. The idea of a sonic involution works exquisitely in an aural, perceived identity, much like a physically created moveable object and is far more complex and four dimensional that can be adequately represented on a typical score (mostly).

 I came up with Fissure Syndrome through pure free association upon listening to the results of this piece several times.  As it turns out, it is a kind of an Apophenia in of itself, as this term lives in the medical world as, superior orbital fissure syndrome (also known as Rochen-Duvigneaud syndrome) is a collection of symptoms caused by compression of structures just anterior to the orbital apex.

For Pearl of Swirl, am fascinated by the perception of sound as physical moving substance or phenomena. To me, this conceptual mega-world is in its infancy and a signification of the music theory and creative methodologies of the future of music.  Pearl of Swirl, here, references Pearl Swirl, a rheoscopic fluid created specifically to see the movement or currents in liquids. Its purpose is scientific in nature, yet, it carries commercial tendrils with trademark statuses and “secret ingredient” branding. It is at once a vital substance category for the science of fluid dynamics and other related fields in order to visualize currents, aerodynamics, turbulence, convection and other phenomena (a not so subtle nod to my father, an award winning physical oceanographer, fluid dynamicist and a very creative one, at that).  On the other side of the coin, pearl swirl is also a novel commercial ingredient added to shampoos and other liquids for the purpose of a non-functional aesthetical “swirl” effect. This duality embodies the inescapable, almost satirical relationship between science and commerce in our culture today.

Punktuation – ‘Nuff said and done

—Glen Whitehead

Danny Gouker: Signal Problems / Love Letters (PFMCD124)

Jeff Kaiser Leave a Comment

[playlist ids="1458"]

Signal Problems

Love Letter

Danny Gouker: Trumpet, Compositions
Eric Trudel: Tenor Saxophone
Adam Hopkins: Bass
Nathan Ellman-bell: Drums

1. Mad Lib 5:28
2. Haiku 4:22
3. Word Play 4:56
4. Enough is Enough 3:24
5. Final Word 4: 24

All music ©2018, Daniel Allen Gouker ASCAP
Recorded at an Airbnb in Catskill, NY by Nathaniel Morgan Aug 15, 2017
Mixed by Nathaniel Morgan, January 2018
Mastered by Wayne Peet at Newzone Studio, March 2018
Artwork and Layout by T.J. Huff

pfMENTUM CD124
PFMCD124

Brad Henkel / Dustin Carlson: F$F / Forgotten Cities (PFMCD128)

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[playlist ids="1456"]

F$F

Forgotten Cities

Brad Henkel – Trumpet
Dustin Carlson – Guitar

1 Forgotten Cities 17:27
2 Between Bodies 12:15

gust charred beach…planet how
they call us prayer or action…
another death may yet take us marching
band with fire, laughing drill, till
all sound red: it’s time!
…hurts less to float
with the tinsel-eyed, hatching all
ready dancing…
it’s our old favorite song, see–then WHAM!
seeing the end alone:
wake up pilot! but so shiny…
and I love you

waving new colors you slow to space here:
it must be we are where now…
being repaired: thank you, meticulous.
and that song we remembered?
if I weren’t so tired I’d say:
let’s join that good parade
sunshine soldier

Recorded at Spaceman Studios by Tom Tierney and Alex Mead-Fox
February 2016, Brooklyn, NY
Mixed by Nathaniel Morgan
Mastered by Wayne Peet
Design by Brian Henkel
Photographs by Nathaniel Morgan
Poem by Storm Garner. Used with permission

pfMENTUM CD128
PFMCD128

George McMullen: Boomerang (PFMCD120)

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[playlist ids="1372"]

George McMullen Trio
Boomerang

George McMullen: Trombone, compositions
Nick Rosen: Bass
Alex Cline: Drums and percussion

1. Boomerang 6:09
2. Follow The Bouncing Ball 5:18
3. Improv I; Earth Mystery 2:16
4. I Loved Her Laugh 5:41
5. The Open Gate 6:31
6. Improv II; Air Currents 2:14
7. Geonomic Preview 5:12
8. Waiting 4:56
9. Improv III; Prairie Wind 3:35
10. Dirty Stinking Lowdown Cryin’ Shame 6:25
11. Improv IV; Fire, Dancing 4:44

Recorded, mixed and mastered by Wayne Peet at Newzone Studio
Recorded 16 August 2015
Graphic Design by Ted Killian

All music © 2018 by George McMullen, ASCAP and SlideThing Music, ASCAP
georgemcmullen.com

pfMENTUM
PFMCD120
www.pfmentum.com

Emily Hay / Steuart Liebig Duo: Nomads (PFMCD118)

Jeff Kaiser Leave a Comment

[playlist ids="1370"]

Nomads

Emily Hay/Steuart Liebig Duo

Emily Hay: Flutes/Voice/Electronics
Steuart Liebig: Basses/Electronics

1. Santa Ana Noise Festival 1:29
2. Saint Mark’s 17:32
3. VU Symposium 02 5:04
4. Shapeshifter Lab 01 17:00
5. Shapeshifter Lab 02 5:14
6. VU Symposium 01 9:03
7. NorCal Noise Festival 19:28

1: Recorded by Mark A. Soden Jr., Santa Ana, CA, December 2015
2: Recorded by Thomas Kozumplik, Glendale, CA, February 2016
3 and 6: Recorded by Devin Maxwell, Park City, UT, July 2016
4 and 5: Recorded by Stephanie Shapiro, Brooklyn, NY, September 2016
7: Recorded by Lob Instagon, Sacramento, CA, October 2016

Mixed and Mastered by Wayne Peet at Newzone Studios

℗ and © 2018 Emily Hay (Emily Hay Music/BMI) Steuart Liebig (Sisong Music/ASCAP)

pfMENTUM
PFMCD118

Trumpets and Basses: Sanctuary (PFMCD108)

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Trumpets & Basses: Sanctuary
Trumpets: Danny Gouker, Jake Henry, Kenny Warren
Basses: Adam Hopkins, Will McEvoy, Zach Swanson

[playlist ids="1235"]

1. From Solid Ground (1:39)
2. Bubbles Rise (1:53)
3. From the Green Beneath (3:33)
4. (and) Ships Maneuver (4:18)
5. Quietly at Night (2:37)
6. Tremors Eventually Subside (8:41)
7. But Disquiet Persists (2:49)
8. The Birds Return (but they are not the same) (6:49)
9. Moments of Clarity (6:20)
10. Resolve into Complexity (6:21)
11. The Void Looks Wider than Before (8:38)

All music ©2017, Trumpets & Basses.

Recorded live at Cadman Congregational Church, Brooklyn (Courtesy of Brooklyn Studios for Dance) by Nathaniel Morgan on April 22, 2016.
Mixed by Nathaniel Morgan, December 2016.
Mastered by Wayne Peet at Newzone Studio, 2017.
Artwork and Layout by T.J. Huff.

pfMENTUM CD108
PFMCD108
www.pfmentum.com

Adam Hopkins: Party Pack Ice (PFMCD107)

Jeff Kaiser Leave a Comment

[playlist ids="1154"]

Adam Hopkins: Party Pack ICE
(please note, this is an EP, the price has been reduced from our full price.)

1. 39.6432°N (1:43)
2. Little Mathletes (4:39)
3. Duckpin (1:44)
4. To Record Only Water For Ten Days (3:51)
5. Hobart’s Law of Kinetics (1:18)
6. The Stephanies (8:47)
7. 76.7408°W (2:00)

Adam Hopkins – bass, compositions
Patrick Breiner – tenor saxophone
Eric Trudel – tenor saxophone
Dustin Carlson – guitar
Nathan Ellman-Bell – drums

Released August 10, 2017

All music © 2017 Adam Hopkins / Add-Hop Music (BMI)
Recorded live by Nathaniel Morgan at iBeam Brooklyn, March 18, 2015.
Mixed and edited by Nathaniel Morgan at Buckminster Palace, 2016.
Mastered by Wayne Peet at Newzone Studio, 2017.
Artwork, layout, and design by TJ Huff, huffart.com.

Very sincere thanks to TJ Huff and Nathaniel Morgan–your artistic and musical visions exceeded all expectations in their contribution to this project. Special thanks to Jeff Kaiser, Maxwell Gualtieri, & Louis Lopez at pfMENTUM for their support and enthusiasm for this record, and for creative music as a whole. And finally thanks to friends, family, and places in Baltimore from various points in time over the past 7 years–you inspired this recording in pretty much every imaginable way.

pfMENTUM CD107
PFMCD107