Michael Vlatkovich: Elasticity (PFMCD087)

$10.00


Mark Weber: poetry
Michael Vlatkovich: trombone and compositions

with

Ion Zoo
Carol Sawyer: voice
Steve Bagnell: tenor sax, bass clarinet
Lisa Miller: piano
Clyde Reed: bass

Track 1 • Poem 1 • 2:15
Track 2 • Poem 2 • 2:18
Track 3 • Poem 3 • 1:49
Track 4 • Poem 4 • 2:35
Track 5 • Winter Things • 4:41
Track 6 • Poem 6 • 2:21
Track 7 • Poem 7 • 3:07
Track 8 • Poem 8 • 2:59
Track 9 • Poem 9 • 3:12
Track 10 • Poem 10 • 2:54
Track 11 • Poem 11 • 3:07
Track 12 • Poem 12 • 10:35
Track 13 • Poem 13 • 7:07
Track 14 • Poem First Day of February • 5:05
Track 15 • Poem 15 • 3:05

© 2012 Mark Weber and Michael Vlatkovich
Recorded at Studio Le Shedde in Vancouver, BC March 7, 2012
Recording by David Sikula
Edited, mixed and mastered at Newzone Studio
by Wayne Peet in Los Angeles April, June 2012
Jeff Schnabel, Art • Jeff Kaiser, Design

pfMENTUM CD087

PFMCD087

SKU: PFMCD087

Reviews

  1. 0 out of 5

    The fusion of modern poetry and modern jazz can be filled with variables that can sometimes make for disappointing results. The poetry of course must be strong and recited with a certain panache; the music must fit into the picture without slavishly following the poetry, at least that is my take.
    All such things happen and happen well with the collaborative synergy between poet Mark Weber and trombonist-composer Michael Vlatkovich, on the album Elasticity (pfMentum 087).

    Weber writes prose-ish free verse that describes scenes from everyday life while also injecting poetic personal inner states and cosmic wanderings and speculations. There of course is no one particular form of poetry that is meant to go with jazz, just like there is no one form of jazz that should go with poetic recitation. The combination of Weber’s poetry and Vlatkovich’s music makes an excellent match.

    Vlatkovich on trombone joins together with the band he calls Ion Zoo. Carol Sawyer sings, Steve Bagnell wields the tenor sax and bass clarinet, Lisa Miller is on piano and Clyde Reed on the double bass. Much of the music is through composed with some free improv to be heard in the interstices. It works wonderfully well as music but also sets the varying moods of Mark Weber’s poetic utterances.

    It is the meeting of two parallel worlds. Both music and poetry are not so much synchronized as they are two sides of a complete aesthetic statement.

    It is one of the more successful such meldings I have heard. That is a testament to all involved, but of course especially Weber and Vlatkovich. Don’t miss this one, whether you are a lover of poetry and jazz combinations, a fan of Mark Weber’s or Michael Vlatkovich’s or both, or even if you just want something different. It’s a good one!

    Grego Applegate Edwards | may 28, 2015 | Gapplegate Music Review

Add a Review

Time limit is exhausted. Please reload CAPTCHA.