Richard Valitutto / Dave Wilson: SLANT (PFMCD121)

Jeff Kaiser Leave a Comment

SLANT

Richard Valitutto, piano
Dave Wilson, tenor saxophone

[playlist ids="2819"]

1. set (zajdi) (3:42)
2. enviros (2:12)
3. -i—e- (8:59)
4. suspiros (3:08)
5. what is the name of that (4:56)
6. poeme (3:13)
7. me then you then me then you then me (2:47)
8. p-tch-s (7:01)
9. you then me then you then me then you (3:46)
10. rise (2:42)

All compositions by Richard Valitutto and Dave Wilson
Recorded and mixed by Vanessa Parr at the Recording Studio at the UCLA Herb Alpert School of Music, Los Angeles, June 10-11 and 27-28, 2016
Mastered by Justin DeHart, Anaheim, California, January 16-17, 2017
Additional engineering by Lorenzo Bühne, Wellington, New Zealand, January 17, 2017
©2018, Richard Valitutto Music (ASCAP) and Hamlin Lake Publishing (ASCAP)
Graphic Design by Ted Killian

The Aaron Copland Fund forMusic (logo)

Special thanks to the Aaron Copland Fund for Music Recording Program, the UCLA Herb Alpert School of Music, and the Longy School of Music of Bard College for their generous financial support of this album project. Additional thanks to Jeff Kaiser, Maxwell Gualtieri, and the entire team at pfMENTUM for their edifying interest in and unflagging patience with this project’s development over the last few years as just one part of their admirable long-term efforts to strengthen and bring together the experimental/creative music community at large through the recording arts.

pfMENTUM CD121
www.pfmentum.com

*****************

SLANT bears the marks of our interest in exploring possibilities as performers composing together instantaneously and spontaneously. This project came together over a period of months, as we cultivated improvisational compositions, revisited them as compositional improvisations, and—circling back repeatedly—layered on top of each the lingering remnants of previous iterations. Tethered as they are to our personal musical pasts, intersections, and divergences, the sounds on these recordings push and pull one another into our own comfortable and uncomfortable areas as listeners and players, leading us into new ways of feeling the air move around us, and moving through that air and into it ourselves.

The recordings of this project came to life just before—and in the midst of—a liminal period when my own path was diverted. It shifted unexpectedly but by my own choice, in a direction that I knew, at the time, would open and close other paths and set new directions. For Richard and (especially) for me, the awareness of my impending departure from Los Angeles permeated the ways the sounds were conceived at all stages of composition, including their capture in recorded form.

The interplay, the interaction, the ways that we move with and against one another —all of these gestures in SLANT take oblique pathways that don’t so much lead to a hoped-for culmination but, instead, end up in a place not previously conceived.

Dave Wilson
Wellington, New Zealand
June 2018

*****************

The pathways spiraling out of set (zajdi) originate in Macedonia, where Dave has been immersed in sound worlds that involve at least a thread of music either emerging from—or gesturing towards—rural life. “Zajdi, zajdi jasno sonce” (Set, set bright sun) is a popular traditional song that slowly unfolds, allowing the singer to display their melismatic facility and virtuosity. The song’s lyrics address the bright sun (telling it to set) and the bright moon (telling it to drown itself). When the text eventually turns to address the forest (which is the “sister” of the singer) it tells it to darken itself along with the singer: the forest for its leaves, the singer for their youth. The last words of the text lament: “your leaves, O forest sister, will return to you again; my youth, O forest sister, will not return to me.” Typically a mournful song drenched in beauty, our reading of the song also shows the aggression and darkness of youth’s furious passing. Forming the melodic and dramatic foundation of this work, the agitated, plangent saxophone lines are supported by a piano part that was directly inspired by another southeastern European influence: the Romanian spectral composer Horațiu Rădulescu, particularly his late piano sonatas.

In enviros we explore the “inner world” of both instruments’ sounds: piano harmonics and saxophone subtones. The compositional concept in this case is not so much linear or narrative as “environmental.” This yields a different improvised performance each time it’s performed, while the piece retains the same distinct feeling and texture. (In the same way that a certain patch of landscape or a particular city street is always identifiably itself and yet is shaped and reshaped anew by those that move through it, the light that strikes it, and the weather patterns that color it from day to day.) Air, space, and resonance come in and out of contact with one another, the shimmering microtonal harmonies trembling as they layer, creating the environmental texture.

-i—e- is a compositional structure based on one of the synthetic scales created by the boundary-pushing American composer, alto saxophonist, bass clarinetist, and flautist Eric Dolphy. In -i—e-, saxophonist and pianist take turns improvising cadenza-like monologues within the scale’s prismatic world of fleeting tonal allusions. After the extended solos, the players converge in ecstatic agreement on a composed melodic head based on the scale, the apotheosis of the improvisation. The instruments guide one another along self-generated paths to assume new trajectories that, for a moment, briefly converge.

suspiros sounds the sighing exasperation, release, and mourning of impending departure, loss, and gain in an impromptu ballad. Super- imposing a microtonal saxophone melody over a tonal/modal piano accompaniment, this piece doesn’t settle or provide catharsis, but remains and persists— pushing and pulling as it breathes in and out.
what is the name of that leans heavily on Ornette Coleman and Prime Time. It takes Coleman’s “What is the name of that song?” and places his horn line on hammers and strings, recasts the electric bass on the horn and interweaves the guitars and drums parts throughout. Multiple melodies, temporalities, and tone colors point this performance in many directions, folding it back again on itself with new creases, and finishing in manic abandon.

poeme is a musing on the mystical, color-drenched music of the late-Romantic early-20th century Russian composer Aleksandr Skryabin, specifically, Opus 69, No. 1, one of his many “Poèmes” for solo piano. This performance takes direct inspiration from the many accounts of the pianist-composer’s seemingly improvised performances of his own works, further illuminated by his idiosyncratic rhythmic notation and a harmonic language almost entirely derived from his synthetic chords.

When we conceptualized me then you then me then you then me, we took turns leading, following, and finding the space in between the constructed dichotomy of leading and following.
p-tch-s is a systematic progression through the anatomy of the instruments themselves, moving from one tactile space to another, embracing sonic possibilities and realizing points of intersection just as they are slipping away.
We’re taking turns again in you then me then you then me then you, but this time you are following me, and then I follow you.

The patterns that emerge from rise point to something new, something incomplete and unformed, something not yet known or not to be known, something that remains, more uncertainties, fewer known ways ahead, acknowledging that perhaps closure is best reached via more questions and fewer explanations.

Richard Valitutto,
Los Angeles, CA – New York, NY
Dave Wilson,
Wellington, New Zealand
July 2018

*****************

PFMCD121

The Vinny Golia Orchestra Live at REDCAT Los Angeles (PFMDVD123)

Jeff Kaiser Leave a Comment

[This product is a DVD]

The
Vinny Golia
Orchestra
Live at
REDCAT
Los Angeles

Set One
1. Set One Introduction 2:31
Primary soloists:
Jonathan Stehney, bassoon
Andrew Rowan, trumpet

2. Show of Force 3:44
Primary soloists:
Carmina Escobar and
Andrea Young, voices

3. 5 (Large Ensemble Version) 11:22
Primary soloists:
Gavin Templeton, alto saxophone
Vinny Golia, baritone saxophone
Stefan Kac, tuba

4. Up In The Sky, Like The Sun At High Noon
(The Eiga Clan Frames The Roscoe Trip) 11:27
Primary soloists:
Erik KM Clark, violin
Dan Clucas and Daniel Rosenboom, trumpets
Jon Armstrong, tenor saxophone

5. Lost & Found (For Henry) 10:49
Primary soloists:
Aniela Perry, cello
Joseph Thel, english horn
Alex Noice, electric guitar
Ingrid Lee, piano

6. Carbine One, Change A Letter 6:13
Primary soloists:
Ben McIntosh, trombone
Michael Mull, alto saxophone
7. Carbine Two 6:09
Primary soloists:
Drew Jordan, trumpet
Vinny Golia and Christine Tavolacci, piccolos

Set Two
1. Set Two Introduction 3:50
Jon Armstrong, tenor saxophone

2. Would You Like Help
On Your Journey To Mottsfield? 6:57
Primary soloists:
Kathy Pisaro, oboe
Vinny Golia, tubax (contrabass saxophone)

3. Soccer Gear Dropped On Religious Leaders 6:57
Primary Soloist:
Alex Noice, guitar
Brian Walsh, bass clarinet
Daniel Rosenboom, piccolo trumpet

4. Barnum Brown Finds Something 4:10
Primary Soloists:
Ingrid Lee, piano
Vinny Golia, sopranino saxophone

5. Just Another Morning 1:57

6. Encore 8:36
Vinny Golia directed improvisation:
Brian Walsh, bass clarinet
Lauren Baba and Andrew Tholl, violin
Christine Tavolacci, bass flute
Jonathan Stehney, bassoon
Alex Noice, guitar
Gavin Templeton, alto saxophone

Special thanks:
Kathy Carbone, Lauren Pratt, Wayne Peet, Allen Kaufman,
David Rosenboom, Marc Lowenstein, California Institute
of the Arts, and all the members of the Vinny Golia New
Music Orchestra

A joint release of
pfMENTUM
and Ninewinds
PFMDVD123/NWDVD400
www.pfmentum.com

Graphic Design: Ted Killian

All compositions and arrangements by Vinny Golia
℗ and © 2018 Ninewinds, BMI

Recorded live at REDCAT in Los Angeles, April 9, 2014
All works Vinny Golia

Conductors Mark Lowenstein and Vinny Golia

Strings
Violins: Andrew Tholl, Henry Webster, Melinda Rice, Stephanie Moorehouse, Lauren Baba, Eric KM Clark, Madeline Falcone
Violas: Cassia Streb, Natalie Brejcha, Morgan Lee Gerstmar
Cellos: Aniela Perry, Derek Stein, April Guthrie, Thea Mesirow
Bass: David Tranchina, Ivan Johnson

Woodwinds
Oboe: Kathy Pisaro
Oboe/English Horn: Joseph Thel
Bassoons: Jonathan Stehney, Archie Carey
C, Alto and Bass Flutes, Piccolo: Christine Tavolacci, Sammi Lee
Saxophones, Flutes, Clarinets: Vinny Golia, Gavin Templeton, Jon Armstrong
Clarinet and Alto Sax: Michael Mull
Bass Clarinet: Brian Walsh

Brass
Trumpets: Dan Clucas, Daniel Rosenboom, Drew Jordan, Andrew Rowan
French Horn: Erin Poulin, Adam Wolf
Trombones: Evan Sprecht, Ben McIntosh, Matt Barbier
Bass Trombone: John Tyler Jordan
Tuba: Stefan Kac

Piano Ingrid Lee

Guitar Alex Noice

Percussion
Mallets: Jodie Landau
Auxiliary Percussion: Tony Gennaro, Vinny Golia
Drum Kit: Andrew Lessman

Voice Andrea Young, Carmina Escobar

Recording Concert recording by Wayne Peet

Mixed and mastered at Newzone Studio, Los Angeles by Wayne Peet with Aaron Druckman (assistant engineer)
Video by Sunlight Digital
Video recording by Allen Kaufman and Jimmy Alioto
Edited and authored by Allen Kaufman

About The Work
When first notified of this REDCAT concert, I planned to meld my electric sextet with my large ensemble; two groups I hold very dear to my heart. Along the way many things happened. I added vocalists, I wanted to have an extended string section and I thought about how I would incorporate the long standing members of the large ensemble and the many new bright faces creating such vibrant music here in Los Angeles. Also along the way tragic events past through the lives of loved ones, the music community suffered the loss of many great musicians and lastly, just a few days ago, Pierre Fauteux passed onto another phase of his continuum. Pierre’s love of music as well as his love of life is embedded in my mind. This concert is a dedication to and a celebration of his time spent on this planet with his lovely wife, Helen, and their two outstanding children, Monique and Jacqueline. It is also dedicated to all those who have lost loved ones.

Pondering on these events happening in my life, the question is (and always has been) how to make music that is meaningful and communicative amidst sorrow and chaos. I still do not know the answer, and my journey takes me deeper into the sounds we create. These compositions were written and re-orchestrated between 2004 and 2014 and are an overview of areas I have been exploring, namely, rhythm, shape, form, and color, with my large and medium ensembles over this time period.

Carbine One, Change A Letter and Carbine Two are portraits of one of my closest friends. Up In The Sky Like The Sun At High Noon is another entry into a series based on driving times in Los Angeles, which as every Los Angeles dweller knows, can be fast and brutal or just plain brutal. This composition also comments on the Eiga clan in feudal Japan, which is a source of inspiration for many other compositions I have written for other various sized ensembles. Show of Force is a commentary on the posturing of nations and how political leaders choose to respond. Lost and Found is for the enigmatic Henry Grimes, whom many thought dead, but who reappeared after many years living in Los Angeles. I have had the great pleasure to perform with Henry numerous times since his reemergence. 5 is the oldest of the compositions, and was originally written for a quartet, then expanded for a quintet, condensed for a saxophone quartet, arranged for a sextet, and finally, orchestrated for this new orchestra. Would you like help in your journey to Motts field? should conjure up images if you enjoy a certain type of film genre.

Lastly, we come to three pieces for Pierre. These compositions, started as a trilogy for percussion and orchestra in 2004, are now just completed. The titles are humorous in honor of Pierre’s love of life, fun, wine, and music. Hopefully you will enjoy them as much as I did while writing them and we have performing them.

In my work there is a balance between the worlds of composition and improvisation. It takes extremely talented musicians to straddle these worlds which includes following a conductor, watching for hand signs and signals, reading complex music, improvising within specific guidelines and interpreting a composer’s ideas into concrete form. I come into contact everyday at CalArts with musicians comfortable working in this way, so after much thought instead of melding my electric sextet with my large ensemble, I decided to take a more orchestral approach and created a new incarnation of my large ensemble for this concert: The Vinny Golia New Music Orchestra. This orchestra comprises many alumni and students who have passed through my various classes and musical groups through the years, as well as CalArts faculty members. The musicians in this orchestra all share a love of exploration and the highest regard for music. It is truly an honor and a privilege to be performing and sharing the stage with them. Tonight we share with you our love of sound in memory of all who have passed through our lives.

—Vinny Golia, Valencia, California, 5 April 2014

Disk Label Text:

The
Vinny Golia
Orchestra
Live at
REDCAT
Los Angeles

A joint release of
pfMENTUM and Ninewinds
PFMDVD123/NWDVD400
www.pfmentum.com

All compositions and arrangements by Vinny Golia
℗ and © 2018 Ninewinds, BMI

Michael Vlatkovich Septet: Ask 7 (PFMCD089)

Jeff Kaiser 1 Comment

[playlist ids="567"]
ask 7 michael vlatkovich septet

michael vlatkovich: trombone, compositions
ron miles: cornet
wade sander: bass trombone
mark harris: alto sax, clarinet, bass clarinet
glenn nitta: tenor sax
kent mclagen: bass
chris lee: drums

1) innumerable mementos of the distant ought-to-be forgottenbut dishearteningly omnipresent never-to-be forgotten past 5:26
2) madam why 10:21
3) 1 3/4 southeast 593,212 avenue apartment zz ask for 7 5:49
4) missing C the limbless percussion just couldn't dance 6:26
5) chair red blue medley 16:27
6) the eventual supremacy of reason 5:00
7) maybe another time 3:26
total 53:09

© 2015 julius ivory music, ascap
recorded 6.9.14 in denver by ron jolly
edited/mixed/mastered 10.14.14 newzone studio los angeles
wayne peet, engineer
jill torberson, artwork
jeff kaiser, design

pfMENTUM CD089

PFMCD089

Saturn’s Rival (PFMCD079)

Jeff Kaiser 2 Comments

[playlist ids="543"]
Saturn’s Rival
Maxwell Gualtieri: Guitar
Susan Allen: Harp
Richard Valitutto: Piano
Ryan Parrish: Winds
Anjilla Piazza: Percussion

Part I 7:28
Part II 21:58
Part III 8:42
Part IV 5:48

All music on this recording was improvised.
Recorded and mixed by Peter Gonzales, May 2011
Mastered by Jeff Kaiser, October 2013
Album art by Sean Tully
Layout by Andrew Rowan

Copyright 2014
Maxwell Gualtieri (ASCAP)
Susan Allen (ASCAP)
Richard Valitutto (ASCAP)
Ryan Parrish (ASCAP)
Anjilla Piazza

pfMENTUM CD079

PFMCD079

Jeff Kaiser and Phil Skaller: Endless Pie (PFMCD072)

Jeff Kaiser 1 Comment

[playlist ids="528"]
Endless Pie is…
Jeff Kaiser: trumpet, flugelhorn, voice, electronics
Phil Skaller: prepared piano

Two CDs:
Total run time 109 minutes

Recorded live in Studio A
University of California San Diego, November 21-22, 2010
Recording engineers: Joe Kucera and Clint Davis

Mixing, mastering, design: Jeff Kaiser, July 2012

All compositions © 2012:Jeff Kaiser Music, ASCAP • Phil Skaller, ASCAP

Blueberry (Disc One)

1. Unchangeable Fundament 13:15
2. Image of a Punctiform 3:35
3. People from the Machinations 8:50
4. Two Unknowns, the One Being 6:07
5. Galileo Uses Propaganda 6:39
6. Anticipated by Bacon 4:42
7. No Immediate Theoretical 3:36
8. Alongside a Moving Tower 3:42

Cherry (Disc Two)

1. The Puppet Does Not Have a Soul 14:54
2. Backward Intersection 5:29
3. Occured without Noticeable 2:37
4. Absence of any Proper Notion 5:29
5. Behave Very Much Like After-Images 7:44
6. We Must Retain 6:34
7. The Problem of Telescopic Vision 2:27
8. As Some Relics 6:04
9. Well-Determined Exceptions 1:31
10. This Paratactic 5:19

pfMENTUM CD072

PFMCD072

Bonnie Barnett Group: In Between Dreams (PFMCD063)

Jeff Kaiser Leave a Comment

[playlist ids="512"]
Bonnie Barnett Group: In Between Dreams

1. Badinage 4:00
2. Matisse* 8:24
(verbatim text: Gertrude Stein)
3. In Between Dreams 5:21
4. Primordial 8:18
5. Nothingness† 10:27
(verbatim text: Jean-Paul Sartre)
6. Set In Stone 4:14
7. Shambala 8:01

TOTAL TIME: 49:15

Bonnie Barnett: vocals
Richard Wood: alto sax, flute, bass clarinet
Hal Onserud: bass
Garth Powell: percussion

All music FMZ Music Co. (BMI) All rights reserved.
All music © pfMentum
For more information: www.pfmentum.com

Bonnie Barnett is an improviser of unusual clarity. A cornerstone of the Los Angeles New Music scene, and the composer of the TUNNEL HUMs, Barnett has mightily contributed to the worlds of contemporary classical music and improvisation and is one of Los Angeles’ hidden treasures. Barnett’s impressive array of vocal extensions creates a personal world of sonic texture that is unrivaled. Barnett’s new CD finds her using texts, tone, and timbre in a stunning display of virtuosity that sends the listener towards worlds of subterranean as well as ethereal delights.

Vinny Golia–Los Angeles CA.–4/22/2011

Recorded (7/10) and mixed (9/10-2/11) by Scott Fraser at Architecture, Los Angeles
Mastered (2/11) by Wayne Peet at Newzone Studio, Los Angeles
*2. Matisse – text: Gertrude Stein’s portrait of the artist Henri Matisse. Permission granted by the Estate of Gertrude Stein, through its Literary Executor, Mr. Stanford Gann, Jr. of Levin & Gann, P.A.
†5. Nothingness – text: “The Origin of Negation”, excerpt from Jean-Paul Sartre’s Essay On Nothingness, courtesy of Philosophical Library, Inc.
Painting on cover: “In Principio”, acrylic on wood panels, by Peter Veblen Van Fleet, 2010.
Photos of the musicians: © Steve De Groodt 2011. All rights reserved.
Design: Ted Killian
© Bonnie Barnett 2011. All rights reserved.
All music FMZ Music Co. (BMI)

BONNIE BARNETT, vocalist, composer and improviser, resides in Los Angeles. She appears on two DICE compilations and has three releases on Nine Winds, including the 2006 “Trio For Two”, a duo with bassist Ken Filiano. She has been exploring the texts of Gertrude Stein, Jean-Paul Sartre and others, and also delights in improvising faux text.

RICHARD WOOD, alto sax, flute and bass clarinet, resides in Los Angeles. Founding member of The And Now Ensemble, he continues to amaze southern California audiences with his intense, yet zany, performances. He has a new CD, “Not Far From Here”, for quintet and septet, which will be released this year on pfMentum.

HAL ONSERUD, bass, currently resides in Santa Barbara. A long-time player on the New York scene, his improvising collaborators include Cecil Taylor, William Parker, Bill Dixon, Vinny Golia, Jackson Krall and many others.

GARTH POWELL, percussionist extraordinaire, resides in the San Francisco Bay Area. He has releases out on Rastascan, Roadcone, Nine Winds, Evander, Beak Doctor and Leo, and has recorded with, among others, Jaap Blonk, John Butcher, Nels Cline, Peter Kowald, Bert Turetsky, Saadet Turkos and the London Improvisors Orchestra.

pfMENTUM CD063

PFMCD063

Michael Vlatkovich and Dottie Grossman: Call & Response & Friends (PFMCD060)

Jeff Kaiser Leave a Comment

[playlist ids="501,503"]
Artists: Los Angeles Recording:
Dottie Grossman: poems
Michael Vlatkovich: trombone
Rich West: drums/percussion
Anders Swanson: bass

L.A. Recording 7/09: Killzone Studio, Los Angeles, CA

Corvallis Recording (indicated by *) 11/05:
Dottie Grossman, poems; Michael Vlatkovich, trombone;
David Storrs, drums/ percussion, toys; Jim Knodle, trumpet

Corvallis Recording: Califas Studio, Corvallis, OR

engineer: Wayne Peet
producers: Michael Vlatkovich, Dottie Grossman
front cover art: Billy Mintz
design: Ted Killian

1. Benjamin Called (1:38)
2. I Wish (1:49)
3. Tumbleweed (:57)*
4. Early Wednesday morning (1:20)*
5. Veterans Hospital (1:18)*
6. Mendocino Coast 1967 (2:21)
7. Merry Christmas, Michael (1:12)*
8. Two Henny Youngman Poems (1:57)
9. This Winter (1:38)
10. Two Appropriations (1:39)*
11. The Two Times I Loved
You The Most In a Car (2:37)
12. Two Poems About Trucks (2:20)
13. Africa (1:29)*
14. Melting Pot (2:35)
15. Zoey Steps Out (1:18)*
16. Quotation (1:56)
17.Little Rock (2:03)*
18.Two More Henny
Youngman Poems (1:48)
19. Helicopter Noise (:50)*
20. This Is What I Do Best (1:33)
21. The People Who Hate Wind (1:22)*
22. Just Before (1:45)
23. Noon Concert (1:36)
24. Another Nose Poem (1:52)*
25. Definition of Happiness/
If I Were Directing This Movie (1:27)*
26. From Iceland (1:36)*
27. Alaska (1:49)
28. What Henny Youngman Loves
Most About America (:47)
29. Vince Salvino (1.16)*
30. Fortune Cookie (3:11)
31. Henny Youngman’s True
Confession (2:06)*
32. Sorry To Disappoint You (1:39)
33. Future Past (1:42)
34. Mark Weber-Type Poem (1:41)

Track 1

Benjamin called
from Long Beach Island,
New Jersey.
I said, “I can hardly hear you;
the ocean’s so noisy.”
He put down the phone
for a second
and screamed,
“Atlantic, will you please
shut up? —
I’m talking to Dottie.”

Track 2

I wish there was a town
called Nirvana
in Nevada.
It would be
a beautiful place,
in a valley,
where the only industry
was happiness.
Wouldn’t it be fun
to send a letter there —
addressed to
“Nirvana, NV”?

Track 3

Something is draped on a fence
until it is time to be tumbleweed.
In this room,
you are heroic,
tasting of summer and vitamins.
Step outside
and the tumbleweed rolls.

Track 4

Early Wednesday morning,
nobody’s kicked up any dust,
nobody’s made a dime, yet.
All the pet dogs
have left-alone faces.

Track 5

Veterans Hospital

The uniform white buildings
shine as pointlessly
as dead men’s teeth.
Here, everything is slower,
even southern,
as they dance to mark
the time between the palm trees
and forget in the clean cut grass.

Track 6

Mendocino Coast, 1967

Inland, where the grasses and grapes lived,
we could not have imagined
the rocks, the cold clouds —
the surf that would surround us
like a headache,
and those long tubes of kelp
like noodles
from another world
where, with the music of foghorns
and wind chimes,
even the kind moon
seemed dangerous.

Track 7

Merry Christmas, Michael

You remind me of a dolphin,
navigating the waves
with your own mysterious sonar
that sounds a lot like a trombone.

Track 8

2 Henny Youngman Poems

Henny Youngman On National Poetry Month

Henny Youngman hates National Poetry Month;
it gives him performance anxiety.

Henny Youngman To His Priest

Forgive me, Father,
for I have sinned.
I’m sexually aroused
by sacred music.

Track 9

This winter feels colder than ever,
or maybe I’m just more sensitive
these days,
when the wind is
a fire engine
and the moon is sinister
and blue.
I’m all bundled up for it,
stamping my feet,
drinking rum,
counting the days
until the yellow flowers.

Track 10

(two appropriations)

Tuna Fishing

“A March 22 “Outdoors” article
about tuna fishing
inadvertently identified an angler
as Rusty Johnson.
His name is Frosty Johnson.”

The Rhythm of Commercials On The Discovery Health Channel

Will a new nose help Wendy
rediscover her self esteem?

Track 11

The Two Times I Loved You the Most In A Car

It was your idea
to park and watch the elephants
swaying among the trees
like royalty
at that make-believe safari
near Laguna.
I didn’t know anything that big
could be so quiet.

And once, you stopped
on a dark desert road,
to show me the stars
climbing over each other
riotously
like insects;
like an orchestra
thrashing its way
through time itself.
I never saw light that way
again.

Track 12

Convoy

Tonight on the road,
the trucks are majestic;
they sashay like elephants
through the turns,
with jewels on their heads
and tails.

Night Convoy

The trucks are wearing rubies in their hair.
They are like beautiful movie stars,
walking carefully in high heeled shoes,
making whooshing noises in the dark.

Track 13

Africa:
its vowels are so seductive,
I get dizzy.
I’ve no wish to deplete
the wildebeest,
I only wish to eat the wildebeest.
Last year’s skeleton crop
set a new record.
The air is succulent
with lions and mahogany.

Track 14

We were sitting around the melting pot
(which is what I call my hairdresser’s):
a Korean, a Vietnamese, and myself (the American)
discussing our homelands calmly
like three women anywhere,
with no mention of bloodshed or memories.
I told them I’d been reading
about Angor Wat
and the Cambodian jungles
where heartless nature
buried the ancient temples
and we all agreed
that could never happen here
in Santa Monica.

Track 15

At eight months old,
Zoey steps out,
wearing a new tooth
and a rose
in her purple hat.

Track 16

“I don’t own an exquisite way to move around in the night.”

Doug Benezra, 9/18/05

It occurs to me that,
when I die,
they might find the necklace
I dropped behind the bed
and wonder
how long it was there,
and whether I’d missed it.
But will they care
about my favorite color,
my long-range plans,
or my habit of searching myself
for signs of rust?

Track 17

“The town has several antique shops and fruit stands, in addition to restaurants and gas stations.“
…from the Little Rock, CA website.

Little Rock

No, not that one —
This one’s in the desert,
about a two hour drive from here
It’s the color of western movies
(blue skies, brown horses).
There’s even a mirage —
rare water and
big Medjool dates,
a fruit stand in the uncomplaining dust
on the way to Valyermo,
to Saint Andrew’s Abbey,
where the dead monks sleep
in the tight-packed earth
of The Holy Land
off the main road.

Track 18

Henny Youngman doesn’t understand
why camping is not permitted
on the cemetery plot
he just paid for.

Henny Youngman On National Public Radio

Once again, I made it through the pledge drive
without contributing a dime.

Track 19

When I remember
how quiet you used to be,
the helicopter noise
in my head
disappears.

Track 20

This is what I do best:
I phone you
and say Congratulations,
Merry Christmas, Happy Birthday,
Happy New Year,
How’s your sister?
Are you better?
Is it hot enough for you?
Thanks, I love you, too.

Track 21

The people who hate wind
are insulated, inland;
they wear hats to keep them safe
from
flying poems.

Track 22

Just before I killed that bug,
I had the guilty thought
that it might be you, reincarnated,
but I told myself that,
if you did return,
it would be as a much higher life-form,
maybe a hummingbird.

Track 23

Noon Concert

These frail, white widows
who get their hair done weekly
in tight curls,
like little flowers
bend their heads
until the applause
says it’s time
to be brave, again.

Track 24

If the bridge of the nose
is really the seat of wisdom,
yours is The Britannica,
edited by Einstein,
illustrated by Picasso.

Track 25

Definition of Happiness #302

Yellow plates on a black table,
and my new curtains,
dancing a tango
in the open window.

If I were directing this movie,
we’d be walking through clouds
wet as dogs’ breath.
Just a dot of pink, for excitement,
and no music, just ice where the wind was.

Track 26

Since she was from Iceland
and didn’t know any better,
she said, “I miss the green of the east.
It’s so yellow here.
Of course, at home, we don’t have any trees.
Once, in New Jersey, I could see Manhattan
across the river,
as if it was a picture of Manhattan.”

Track 27

Alaska

Once, I got into a taxi
whose driver wore a turban.
We chatted about traffic and travel
and he said he absolutely loved Alaska,
where he’d worked on the pipeline for five years.
He blushed when he told me, “You know,
I’m a Muslim. We’re supposed to pray
five times a day, facing Mecca.
But sometimes, when nobody’s watching,
I face Alaska.”

Track 28

What Henny Youngman
loves most about America
is that anybody can
grow up to be the Pope.

Track 29

We were all sitting around,
talking about what kind of animal
we’d like to be,
and Vince said, “A gorilla,
because they’re the most like us.”

Track 30

Fortune Cookie

You are going to look exactly
like your father —
one of those draped,
semi-ecstatic old Jews
you see framed
on the mantel
in grandmothers’ houses.
Like him,
you will lapse into Yiddish,
throwing your hands up
in mock surrender.
And your lips will move
when you read,
and your children will
imitate you.

Track 31

Henny Youngman’s True Confession
(thanks to M.B.)

I think that, if I were to talk to a rabbi,
he’d listen and all,
but then we’d just end up
with him asking me
to explain the Internet.
I went to a palm reader,
said, “I’m in love with a straight guy
who can’t love me back.”
She said, “Why would you
want to do that?”
I’m, like, exiled,
all the best people are.

Track 32

Sorry To Disappoint You

As the elder in your Chinese house,
I have almost no wisdom to offer:
A few books, a few poems –
I’m not sure there’s anything else,
except that I once shook John Coltrane’s hand,
and sex in the morning is more fun
than cereal.
The rest you already know.

Track 33

Future Past

If I had stayed asleep
I would have missed
the fun of speaking English,
the quiet satisfaction
of appointments kept,
the way dreams change
when you try to describe them.

Track 34

Mark Weber-Type Poem

So my latest rejection comes from Iowa,
about a week before Christmas:
“Thank you for allowing us
to consider your work…”
I picture the writer
at a desk overlooking a corn field.
There’s a droopy plant
on the windowsill
and a volume of Yeats or Keats
nearby.
It has been a tough day,
and here I come,
galloping into that landscape
with my palm trees and deserts,
coyotes and surfers.

pfMENTUM CD060

PFMCD060

Jeff Kaiser and David Borgo: KaiBorg / Harvesting Metadata (PFMCD058)

Jeff Kaiser 1 Comment

[playlist ids="484,486,487,488,490,492,493,494,495,497,498"]
KaiBorg

David Borgo: soprano and sopranino saxophones, chalumeau,
dudukophone, whistlophone, mijwiz, slide whistle and laptop

Jeff Kaiser: quartertone trumpet, flute, voice and laptop

1. Harvesting 1:24
2. Flow Control 8:19
3. Maladaptive Optimization 5:32
4. Nodular 2:41
5. Exception Conditions 5:28
6. Threshing 2:46
7. Resumption Tokens 4:48
8. Postural Schema 4:05
9. Hypernymic Entailment 16:56
10. Intereaction 4:15
11. Reaping 4:47

(Click on any track for excerpt)

Recorded by Tom Erbe, 1-2 July 2009, Studio A, University of California San Diego
All performances are improvisations with live electronic processing
Mixed and mastered by Jeff Kaiser and David Borgo, November 2009
All music © 2010 by David Borgo Music, ASCAP and Jeff Kaiser Music, ASCAP
For more information:
kaiborg.com
davidborgo.com
jeffkaiser.com
pfMENTUM CD058

PFMCD058

Antony DiGennaro: A Lonesome Fog (PFMCD051)

Jeff Kaiser Leave a Comment

[playlist ids="469"]
1. Winston Niles Rumfoord 3:38
2. Insomnia I 1:23
3. A Foot Unsocked 4:22
4. Dunes 2:37
5. Sleep I 2:46
6. The Boatman Calls 2:41
7. Insomnia II 0:55
8. Sleep II 8:22
9. Hoist By One’s Own Petard 4:04
10. The Day of the Lobster 4:02
11. Insomnia III 2:39
12. The Giant 10:04

The music contained herein is merely a brief snapshot, expressing my state of mind at the moment of its conception and execution. It is also an homage to the beautiful and often overlooked natural landscapes that this country has to offer.
This music is all solo guitar, free of overdubs, electronic devices (except for microphones, amplifiers and guitar pickups) and post-processing, save for the mastering process.

Special thanks to members of tinhorn justice, plotz!, mossman, the dog of tears, sandra powers, wenchung lu, bob clendenen, wayne peet, steuart liebig, michael jon fink, vinny golia, barry schrader, susie allen, ulrich krieger, arthur jarvinen, doug maher, tom monaghan, owen cunningham, bryden and tessa digennaro, and the rest of my friends, teachers and family

Extreme special thanks to jeff kaiser, kyle ross and to my parents

Recorded/engineered by kyle ross at relec multimedia studios, val verde, ca
Produced/mixed by antony digennaro
Mastered by wayne peet at newzone studios, los angeles, ca
Graphic design by sandra powers with assistance by steuart liebig
Photography by antony digennaro

pfMENTUM CD051

PFMCD051