Brad Dutz: Nine Gardeners Named Ned (PFMCD026)

Jeff Kaiser 1 Comment

[playlist ids="414"]
BRAD DUTZ: mallet percussion, hand percussion
CHRIS WABICH: drumset, steel drum, percussion
KIM RICHMOND: Bb clarinet
BOB CARR: bass clarinet
SARA SCHOENBECK: bassoon
ELLEN BURR: C flute, alto flute, piccolo
JOHN FUMO: trumpet, piccolo trumpet
KRIS TINER: trumpet, flugelhorn #4, #8, #9
WILLIAM ROPER: tuba, spoken word
TREY HENRY: acoustic bass
DEAN TABA: acoustic bass #4, #6, #8, #9
ANDERS SWANSON: acoustic bass solo #1
JASPER DUTZ [age 9]: bass clarinet, Bb clarinet

1. Look at the pretty weeds…they’re dead 13:38
2. Rotted vegetables…too late to pick 3:45
3. Rotted fruit…infested with insects 6:07
4. Distribute fertilizer…evenly 5:56
5. I like brown leaves especially when they’re torn 11:54
6. Leaf blowers are stinky…and loud 2:31
7. Norbert rakes bark…and mulch 7:58
8. Wicked late for nite blooming…but not dusk 6:16
9. Plant the bulbs…frequently 3:47

all compositions by Brad Dutz • (c) 2005, leakyspleen music, BMI
recorded by BRAD DUTZ 2003-2004
mixed and mastered by WAYNE PEET at NEWZONE, july 2004-jan 2005
cover cartoons: JASPER DUTZ • layout and design: KAORU MANSOUR and JEFF KAISER
thanks to: YAMAHA, VIC FIRTH, PAISTE, REMO, MOUNTAIN RYTHYM

 

NINE GARDENERS NAMED
1. Look at the pretty weeds…they’re dead
Kim Richmond-clarinet [solo]; John Fumo-trumpet [solo]; Sara Schoenbeck-bassoon [solo]; Anders Swanson-acoustic bass [solo]; Brad Dutz-vibes, marimba, crotales, bongos, cajon bongos, gong; Chris Wabich-drumkit; William Roper-tuba; Bob Carr-bass clarinet; Ellen Burr-flute; Trey Henry-acoustic bass
2. Rotted vegetables…too late to pick
Bob Carr-bass clarinet; Ellen Burr-alto flute; Brad Dutz-marimba; Sara Schoenbeck-bassoon; Kim Richmond-clarinet; text created and spoken by William Roper-tuba
3. Rotted fruit…infested with insects
same as above plus Chris Wabich-perc; featuring William Roper
4. Distribute fertilizer…evenly
Chris Wabich-steel drum [solo]; Jasper Dutz-bass clarinet;
Ellen Burr-flute; Dean Taba-acoustic bass; Kris Tiner-trumpet;
Brad Dutz-repique jamau, vibes, darabuka, cymbals, crotales Hadjira, khol; Ellen Burr-flutes
5. I like brown leaves especially when they’re torn
Chris Wabich-drumkit, percussion, steel drum [solo]; Brad Dutz-xylophone, congas, bongos, darabuka, marimba [solo]; Bob Carr-bass clarinet [solo]; Ellen Burr-flute; Trey Henry-acoustic bass; John Fumo-trumpet; Sara Schoenbeck-bassoon; Kim Richmond-clarinet; William Roper-tuba
6. Leaf blowers are stinky…and loud
Brad Dutz-marimba, vibes; Ellen Burr-flute;, Dean Taba-acoustic bass; William Roper-tuba; Jasper Dutz-bass clarinet, Bb clarinet;
John Fumo-trumpet
7. Norbert rakes bark…and mulch
Ellen Burr-piccolos [solo]; William Roper-tuba; John Fumo-piccolo trumpet; Sara Schoenbeck-bassoon; Bob Carr-bass clarinet; Kim Richmond-clarinet; Brad Dutz-piccolo snare, field snare, orchestra bells, bass drums, piatti, snare drum; Chris Wabich-piccolo snare, field snare, bass drum, piatti, snare drum
8. Wicked late for nite blooming…but not dusk
Sara Schoenbeck-bassoon; Bob Carr-bass clarinet; Kim Richmond-clarinet; Dean Taba-acoustic bass; William Roper-tuba; Kris Tiner-trumpet; Brad Dutz-vibes, crotales, cymbals, xylophone; Ellen Burr-flutes
9. Plant the bulbs…frequently
Sara Schoenbeck-bassoon; Bob Carr-bass clarinet; Kim Richmond-clarinet; Dean Taba-acoustic bass; William Roper-tuba; Kris Tiner-trumpet; Brad Dutz-marimba, xylophone; Ellen Burr-flute, piccolo; Chris Wabich-steel drum

pfMENTUM CD026

PFMCD026

The Jeff Kaiser Ockodektet: 17 Themes for Ockodektet (PFMCD010)

Jeff Kaiser 1 Comment

[playlist ids="374,376"]
Woodwinds: Eric Barber, Vinny Golia, Emily Hay, Lynn Johnston
Trumpets: Dan Clucas, Kris Tiner
Euphonium and Valve-Trombone: Eric Sbar
Tuba: Mark Weaver
Prepared Acoustic Guitar: Ernesto Diaz-Infante
Electric Guitar/Electronics: G.E. Stinson
Organ/Theremin/Electronics: Wayne Peet
Contrabasses: Jim Connolly, Scott Walton
Drums: Billy Mintz, Richie West
Percussion: Brad Dutz
Conductor/Trumpet: Jeff Kaiser

Suite One
1. Dirge 2:31
2. Clad Like Birds 3:40
3. Amplifying Their Parallels 7:01
4. Nothing May Be Taken Naturally 2:56
5. Even with Diagrams 8:12
6. One Absolute Material 5:54
7. Figures of this In-Between 3:05
8. Figures to be Actualities 4:27
9. Figure with Wings 7:09
Suite Two
10. Coincidentia Oppositorum 3:55
11. Where His Third Eye Could Be 3:59
12. Fulfilled by the Reflected Image 7:41
13. There is No Profit from Dreams 7:55
14. Into That Nothing-Between 5:07
Total Time: 73:44

All compositions and arrangements by Jeff Kaiser, ©2002 Jeff Kaiser Music, ASCAP
Recorded direct to DAT – on the occasion of Jeff Kaiser’s 40th birthday party – at Ventura City Hall, Ventura, CA, 12.8.01
CD recording, mastering, design, and layout by Jeff Kaiser

“Dreams are sleep’s watchful brother, of death’s fraternity, heralds, watchmen of that coming night, and our attitude toward them may be modeled upon Hades, receiving, hospitable, yet relentlessly deepening, attuned to the nocturne, dusky, and with a fearful cold intelligence that gives permanent shelter in his house to the incurable conditions of human being.”
— James Hillman, The Dream and the Underworld

pfMENTUM CD010

PFMCD010

Steuart Liebig / The Mentones: Locustland (PFMCD017)

Jeff Kaiser 1 Comment

[playlist ids="389"]
Steuart Liebig/The Mentones
LOCUSTLAND

The Mentones
Tony Atherton: alto saxophone
Joseph Berardi: drumset, percussion
Bill Barrett: chromatic harmonica
Steuart Liebig: contrabassguitar

broom – – 3:27
graveyard – – 4:41
mojave boxcar – – 4:46
drifter – – 7:47
honky tonk burn – – 6:48
westpoint, mississipi – – 8:19
small fry – – 0:45
burnt umber – – 2:50
nighthawk – – 5:43
howl & tumble – – 4:01
gasoline jelly – – 6:33
lightning bug – – 3:47
nowhere calling – – 5:57

©2004, steuart liebig/sisong music (ascap)
recorded at newzone studios, by wayne peet;
mixed at newzone studios, by wayne peet and steuart liebig
mar vista, california, 2000

photos/montages by steuart liebig
layout by steuart liebig and jeff kaiser
gear thanks to fodera basses, thomastik-infeld strings and raven labs

“First let’s talk about Steuart Liebig, the multi-faceted miscreant who squeezed the hybrid beast known as the Mentones out of his juicy mind. Steuart is well known in L.A. as one of the most significant improvising electric bass torturers and electronic manipulators in recent memory and, I’m grateful to say, a major contributor to most of the music I’ve done in the last decade and a half. The metaphor of a diamond with its many facets comes to mind, but that doesn’t quite get it. Imagine the diamond periodically reverting to its primal molten state and shooting out semi-controlled bursts of radioactive plasma melting everything in its reach. I could say that for Steuart the Mentones is an anomaly, but in a way every project he constructs is an anomaly. I will say this—there is nothing like the Mentones on this earth that I’ve ever heard of and even though you may recognize some of its disparate original elements, you will be whacked by how cohesively they come together in Liebig’s compositions. An adult dose of Little Walter crashing his Coupe de Ville into Ornette Coleman’s harmolodien. Howling Wolf gnawing on John Coltrane’s left ear like Mike Tyson. As for the other men in the Mentones: Bill Barrett takes the chromatic harp well beyond its limits like a rubber band stretched into a Mobius strip. Tony Atherton is soulful, relentless and driving. Joe Berardi grooves these odd time signatures like his mother nursed him on non-Euclidean geometry. It’s all that and it’s definitely enough.”

– G.E. Stinson

pfMENTUM CD017

PFMCD017

Rich West: Bedouin Hornbook (PFMCD016)

Jeff Kaiser 1 Comment

[playlist ids="387"]
Rich West Bedouin Hornbook

Chris Heenan: bass clarinet, alto saxophone
Bruce Friedman: trumpet
Jeremy Drake: electric guitar
Scot Ray: eb tuba
Rich West: drums

1. Bugge 11:20
2. Tribology 6:34
3. Twang 14:41
4. Tread 8:22
5. Friends of the Vacuum 9:00
6. Tychai 1 and 2 7:25
7. Curly 4:10
8. Furcifer 6:44
Total Time 68:16

All compositions by Rich West
©2004, Richwest Recordings, ASCAP
Recorded April 29, 2002 and March 12, 2003
Recorded and Mastered by Scott Fraser
Mixed by Rich West and Scott Fraser
at Architecture, Los Angeles, CA
CD Design and Layout by Jeremy Drake and Jeff Kaiser

“The sad thing about L.A. is that it’s hard keeping people in the same room for extended periods of time.”
— Rich West

The title is from a book by Nate Mackey, which I haven’t read. However, in the spirit of Richard Meltzer’s infamous “previews” of bands to whom he’s neither listened or talked prior to writing about them, I’ll concentrate on the nomadic implications of Bedouin (from Webster’s New World Dictionary of the American Language); nomad, “a member of a tribe, nation or race having no permanent home, but moving about constantly in search of food, pasture, etc.”, and suggest that this band is composed of nomads as only an L.A. band can be. Luckily, Rich West was able to get them in the same room at least long enough to produce this exuberant album. It’s not just that the tunes (he says, “everyone had a hand in some of the arrangements”) are strong and interesting (shades of Igor Stravinsky, Frank Zappa, Nino Rota), the playing — both written and improvised — is, too.

A surprising variety of moods and textures is developed, ranging from the inviting and theatrical “welcome to the show” feel of Tribology to the especially attractive Gyuto-Monks-meet-Fellini scenario on Twang. The sounds are oddly appealing in some non-traditional ways (murky trumpet, bell-like guitar). When it’s all over, you feel as if you’ve been someplace new. I can’t imagine any other five players who could play this music and make that happen. This is music that knows the difference between self-expression and self-indulgence, for which we should all be very happy.

— Dorothea Grossman, Los Angeles, CA, October 2003

pfMENTUM CD016

PFMCD016

Ted Killian: Flux Aeterna (PFMCD007)

Jeff Kaiser 1 Comment

BACK IN PRINT! We have 10 copies left…

[playlist ids="668,670,671"]
Ted Killian: Electric and acoustic guitars, samples, loops, sound design

Loop-based guitar improvisations/excursions recorded “live” in the studio in a single take. Ted's music is frequently compared to that of David Torn, Steve Tibbetts, Terje Rypdal, Robert Fripp, Adrian Belew, Sonny Sharrock, Nels Cline, or Bill Frisell, sometimes even David Gilmour, Jeff Beck or Uli Jon Roth. But Ted cites influences that come from all over the map: Leo Kottke, Eliott Sharp, Paul Dresher, Scott Johnson, Vernon Reid, John Abercrombie, Michael Brook, Daniel Lanois, Gary Lucas, Jim Thomas, John Fahey, Jimi Hendrix, John Mclaughlin, Frank Zappa, Pat Metheny, Buckethead, Chet Atkins and Les Paul. Yet, despite this, there is still something uniquely “Killianesque” in his approach. Ted is a guitarist who isn't afraid to paint with the instrument's full color “palette.” He's not afraid to make wild, adventurous, passionate “in-you-face” music or sonorous, languid, peaceful harmonic/melodic explorations.

Ted Killian: A Biography

Born and raised in sunny Southern California, Ted Killian has been a guitarist for over 4 decades now and he still hasn't managed to learn to play the thing correctly. But, as it turns out, this may have turned out to be a pretty good thing. Without necessarily having set out to do so, Killian has found his own unique “voice” on an instrument that is nearly ubiquitous in modern popular music. His sound is a peculiar amalgam of odd, sometimes familiar, influences: folk, pop, blues, rock, metal, jazz, electronica, electro-acoustic “art music,” and just plain noise (“!”) that begs one to think the word “fusion” but is much more primal, gut-level and organic than any connotation that word may conjure.

Killian's music is full of contradictions. It is primitive and sophisticated, visceral and sensitive, abstract and accessible, complex and blood simple all at once. It is given birth by heavy doses of technology (MIDI guitar, a plethora of electronic effects, digital echo devices, samplers, and all manner of assorted “gadgets”) but the result is amazingly human sounding. There is blood and sweat mixed in with all of the diodes and cables — and more than a small measure of passion. This intensity is not something that can be seen in the usual form of typical guitarist “histrionics” but can be heard in every note of the music itself.

Killian began playing and experimenting early on, but (in terms of public performance) bloomed late. Beginning in the late 1980s, he began performing his original music in conjunction with the Ventura New Music Concert Series (Southern California)– aided by close friend and colleague, avant-jazz trumpeter, Jeff Kaiser. So began a long series of ever-changing concerts and presentations all around Southern California. Some of these were in connection to SEAMUS, an acronym for the national “new music” organization: the Society for Electro Acoustic Music in the United States (Killian was introduced to the organization by Kaiser in 1990 and became President of the Los Angeles chapter in 1992). Ted's has been interviewed as a featured composer on “Music of the Americas” on KPFK radio in Los Angeles. Since the debut of “Flux Aeterna” his music has been played on literally dozens of radio stations around the globe and has garnered critical praise in as many publications internationally. In recent years, he has composed music for ballet, “fixed” gallery installations, multi-discipinary art performances, large ensembles and small groups. And, after all of this, Killian has still somehow managed to avoid having ever been in anything resembling a “band.”

Ted Killian is a 1982 graduate of UCSB with a Bachelors degree in visual arts. Since then he has exhibited paintings, sculpture and computer art in a number of galleries, museums and other venues across the country. He was a 1992 appointee to the “Task Force for Visual Arts” in Ventura, CA. He supports his musical/artistic activities with his “day job” as a freelance graphic designer for various musical instrument and high-tech manufacturers. He currently resides in Southern Oregon with his wife, 3 sons, 3 guinea pigs, and 2 goldfish.

pfMENTUM CD007

PFMCD007