Schroeder, Campello, Godoy: Barely Cool (PFMCD090)

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[playlist ids="761"]

Barely Cool
Schroeder / Campello / Godoy

1 Estranho – 2:06
2 Soundweaving – 6:02
3 Rubber Tongue – 9:05
4 Barely Cool – 7:24
5 The Assertive Fog – 6:30
6 Throws – 5:58
7 Chinelas Ferventes – 8:47
8 Whistle and Hustle – 11:57
9 Under a Red Moon – 7:38
10 Barely Cooler – 4:00

Schroeder: Franziska is a saxophonist enthusiastic about new sounds and new approaches to the instrument. Since training in contemporary music in Australia in the late 90s, she has been following a path of improvisation and now mainly plays free improvised musics. Franziska lectures at the Sonic Arts Research Centre in Belfast.

Franziska é uma saxofonista entusiasta de novos sons e possibilidades do instrumento. Desde seu treinamento em música contemporânea na Austrália no final dos anos 90, tem seguido o caminho da improvisação e atualmente foca na improvisação livre. Franziska leciona no Sonic Arts Centre em Belfast.

Campello: Marcos plays (way) out of tune guitar like there’s no tomorrow.

Marcos toca guitarra (absurdamente) desafinada como se não houvesse amanhã.

Godoy: Renato grew up playing among rock bands in Rio de Janeiro. Since early 00’s, he began to incorporate improvisation into his projects, which include Bossal, Muwei and Chinese Cookie Poets.

Renato cresceu tocando em bandas de rock do Rio de Janeiro. Desde o começo dos anos 2000 começou a incorporar a improvisação em seus projetos, dentre os quais destacam-se Bossal, Muwei e Chinese Cookie Poets.

About:

During an ethnographic research project on free improvisation in Brazil, saxophonist Franziska Schroeder met guitarist Marcos Campello and drummer Renato Godoy. The trio joined musical forces in May 2014 at Rio de Janeiro’s Audiorebel recording studio to play and record. “Barely Cool” is the result of a day long musical encounter of the three improvisors.

Durante sua pesquisa etnográfica sobre improvisação livre no Brasil, a saxofonista Franziska Schroeder conheceu o guitarrista Marcos Campello e o baterista Renato Godoy. Em maio de 2014 o trio se juntou no estúdio AudioRebel, no Rio de Janeiro, para uma sessão de improvisação. “Barely Cool” é o resultado desse encontro.

Dates: 19 May 2014
Recorded at Audiorebel, Rio de Janeiro
Engineer:  Pedro Azevedo
Mixed and Mastered by: Marcos Campello
Artwork by: Arthur Lacerda
All Music © Schroeder/Campello/Godoy

“Special thanks to the Higher Education Academy UK (HEA), who enabled Franziska Schroeder’s ethnographic work in Brazil as part of an international fellowship, and to the Sonic Arts Research Centre at Queen’s University Belfast”

pfMENTUM CD090

PFMCD090

Barely Cool, new trio recording from pfMENTUM

Dedicated to creative music—and the musicians that make it. Barely Cool: Schroeder, Campello, Godoy An exciting recording session, with an equally exciting story behind it! From the liner notes: “During an ethnographic research project on free improvisation in Brazil, saxophonist Franziska Schroeder met guitarist Marcos Campello and drummer Renato Godoy. The trio joined musical forces in May 2014 at Rio de …

Bubbeleh (PFMCD082)

Jeff Kaiser 1 Comment

[playlist ids="549"]
Andrew Conrad: Clarinet, Tenor Sax
Greg Zilboorg: Trumpet
Lauren Baba: Violin, Viola
Max Kutner: Guitar
Philip Rankin: Wurlitzer, Synthesizer, Melodica, Pump Organ, Tack Piano, Clave, Guiro
Rusty Kennedy: Bass
Colin Woodford: Drums, Congas, Shakers, Rattles, and Ankle Bells

1. Dybbuk Square Dance 3:29
2. Fear of Heights 5:07
3. Schmutzy Glasses 5:26
4. Woulda…Coulda…MESHUGGAH!!! 3:44
5. (An Honest) Living 2:19
6. Choots-Pah 3:55
7. Grepse 4:17
8. Simcha Boytchik Hintele (Puppy Party) 3:35
9. Mosesque 6:56
10. Bubberella 4:30
11. Czytzfachykz 4:54

1, 2, 5, 9, 10 composed by Max Kutner, © 2014 Maladept Music, ASCAP

4, 6, 7, 8 composed by Philip Rankin, © 2014 Jewish Shark Attack, ASCAP

3 composed by Greg Zilboorg, © 2014 Shouting Dog, ASCAP

11 composed by Rusty Kennedy, © 2014 Jewish Shark Attack, ASCAP

Recorded by Samur Khouja at Seahorse Sound Studios, Los Angeles, August 20-22, 2013
Assistant Engineer: Alex DeGroot
Mixed by Brian Saia, October-December 2013
Mastered by John Baffa at TVTray Studios, Simi Valley, CA, December 2013
Produced by Maxwell Ryan דוד Kutner and Philip Jason שַׂמֵחַ Rankin
Executive Producer: William Ross Gibson
Associate Producer: Debra Fredericks, Tamasaurus Rex
Logo by Dawn Chan * Layout and design by J. Carver

Max and Phil would like to thank the band: Greg, Rusty, Lauren, Andrew and Colin. Everyone who helped record this album: Samur, John and especially Brian. KT Pierce for photography and building our website. Phil would like to thank his Mother, Jill; his Father, David; his sister Michele; and his dog, Max. Max would like to thank his family: Leslie, Samantha, Stephanie, Art and Michael for their tireless, inexhaustible support and encouragement. Most importantly we would like to thank everybody who donated to our Indiegogo Campaign. This album would not have been made possible without your generous donations.

pfMENTUM CD082

PFMCD082

Phil Skaller and Danny Holt Duo: Music of Mark Dresser (PFMCD062)

Jeff Kaiser 1 Comment

[playlist ids="510"]
Phil Skaller and Danny Holt Duo: Music of Mark Dresser

1 Flac (5:12)
2 Flocus (13:09)
3 Para Waltz (10:48)
4 Digestivo (9:37)
5 Aperitivo (12:33)

Philip Skaller and Danny Holt: pianos, celeste, toy piano, melodica, percussion
All compositions by Mark Dresser (Del Dresser Music/ASCAP)
Arrangements by Philip Skaller and Danny Holt
Recorded October and November 2008 and June 2009 at Roy O. Disney Music Hall, California Institute of the Arts, Valencia, CA
Piano Technician: Alan Eder
Engineered by Steve Rusch
Edited and Mixed by Edmund P. Monsef at The Hacienda, Los Angeles, CA
Mastered by Jeff Kaiser
Artwork by Iva Gueorguieva
Graphic Design by Ted Killian
Executive Producer: Danny Holt
This recording was made possible in part by a Subito grant from the Los Angeles chapter of the American Composers Forum.
© 2010 Philip Skaller and Danny Holt

I was quite surprised when Phil Skaller approached me about recording a whole CD of my compositions in duo with Danny Holt. Though I had composed this music between 1994 and 2008 for my own groups, and arranged it for various formations, I had never imagined it for two pianos.

I’ve known Phil since 2002 when he was my teaching assistant at Hampshire College in an improvisation class. I introduced some of my tunes to the students and Phil, especially, devoured the music and its improvisational concepts. I had been hearing the praises of Danny Holt for years from Phil, but it was not until 2008 that I first heard this duo perform a suite of my compositions at UC San Diego. I was quite impressed and flattered by the wit, musical virtuosity, and pure improvisational fantasy that these two gifted young musicians brought to my music.

The compositions represented on this CD were conceived as abstractions and deconstructions of known jazz forms and related idiomatic music. What Phil Skaller and Danny Holt have done is to deconstruct my deconstructions. They have taken my music in directions that I doubt that I would have ever conceived and in some ways, made the music more flexible and malleable.

The first track, Flac, recorded on “Aquifer” (Cryptogramophone), was originally designed as a rhythmically gear-shifting Klezmer-like tune that improvisationally develops from the material itself and returns to the theme. Phil and Danny’s version has a rhythmic and sound character reminiscent of both Conlon Nancarrow’s studies for player piano and John Cage’s works for prepared piano. The alternation of fragments of the tune and its improvisational implications comes in waves, yet a thread of the thematic materials is always present.
Flocus was composed for trumpet, voice, bass, piano and drums and recorded on “Force Green” (Soul Note). It was conceived as four independent lines, each in a different meter, which are layered one upon another and developed in collective improvisation. Phil and Danny’s version takes a different direction, introducing a more classical theme and variation approach, while each of the lines independently develops outside of the tempo grid. This interpretation, though referring to themes, transcends the materials and becomes a springboard for episodes of virtuoso invention and dramatic return.

Para Waltz was composed as a vehicle to melodically and harmonically improvise on a metric modulating jazz waltz. Danny and Phil’s interpretation takes a very different direction, initially eschewing the tempo aspect and focusing on a more spacious approach, layering the timbres of glockenspiel, piano, and piano harmonics. The temporal aspect isn’t highlighted until midway, with the introduction of cymbals demarcating the time. The thematic material is finally introduced whole and floats on out.

Similarly Digestivo, recorded on “Aquifer” and “The Marks Brothers” (W.E.R.F), was conceived to create a metric modulating twelve-bar blues in B-flat. My idea was to abstract the idea of ‘substitute changes’ traditionally applied to jazz harmony and apply it to the domain of tempo. Unlike the original, which has a single underlying tempo throughout, Danny and Phil’s version is freer, starting out of time. They eventually introduce the tune and the different tempos, but in the end, leave the form completely, in an expansive and satisfying way.

Aperitivo, composed for piano, bass, and voice, is an even more abstract version of the blues than Digestivo. Recorded on “Time Changes” (Cryptogramophone), this slower metric modulating twenty-four bar form in C minor doesn’t even articulate the ground pulse, creating a feel that is inherently looser and less polyrhythmic than Digestivo. Phil Skaller and Danny Holt’s version is an extremely inventive and expansive finale to the CD, utilizing pianos, toy piano, melodica, and percussion. Improvisationally, they’ve chosen an even more abstract approach, which alternates the gestalt of tempo changes of the head and a freer approach that abstracts motifs, melody, and an almost fugue-like beginning. At about minute nine the tune grinds into a vamp, modulates faster, and phases, juxtaposing shreds of the melody back into the vamp, and returning to the twenty-four bar head.

Hearing Phil Skaller and Danny Holt’s interpretations of my music is both affirming and inspiring. I am impressed with the combination of their virtuoso playing, interpretative skills, and pure musical imagination. I look forward to hearing what they do next.

Mark Dresser
September 2010

pfMENTUM CD062

PFMCD062

Steuart Liebig / Stigtette: Delta (PFMCD033)

Jeff Kaiser 1 Comment

[playlist ids="429,431"]
Steuart Liebig/Stigtette

Ellen Burr: Flute, Alto Flute, Piccolo
Andrew Pask: Clarinet, Bass Clarinet
Sara Schoenbeck: Bassoon
Steuart Liebig: Contrabassguitars (prepared, applied tools)

hector 2:11
kprs:
mahoning 2:30
alchemy 8:49
light cloud, dark cloud 5:24
1956-j no.2 3:51
dynamite’s dionysian dance 5:08
cold green mystery 4:43
our lady of the illuminated hand 5:52
seven dreams about time 14:07
render 4:50
secret one-hand shake 4:24
knowledge is gravity 5:11

all music copyright steuart liebig/sisong music (ascap) 2005
recorded at newzone studios, mar vista, california, 28-29 may 2005, by
wayne peet. mixed at newzone studios, june-august 2005, by wayne peet
and steuart liebig. mastered by wayne peet.
artwork and layout by steuart liebig
photos by ken luey

” kprs” is a suite played as four discrete parts; “seven dreams about
time” is seven parts played as a continuous whole.

hector
Written as an hommage to Hector Berlioz and inspired by his writing for woodwinds.

paint
A four-part hommage (mahoning; alchemy; light cloud, dark cloud; 1956-j no. 2) to four of my favorite painters: Franz Kline, Jackson Pollack,Mark Rothko and Clyfford Still.

dynamite’s dionysian dance
Inspired by Frederick Neitzsche’s “Also Sparch Zarathrustra.”

cold green mystery
After a line in the “Thousand Nights and One Night” – –
also known as “The Arabian Nights” – – describing the sea.

our lady of the illuminated hand
A little requiem of sorts.

seven dreams about time
Based on a book that explains Einstein’s theories of time through fictionalized accounts of his dreams.

render
My idea of a musical illustration of the concept of
“render unto Caesar that which is Caesar’s . . . ”

secret one-hand shake
A basic rhythmic idea stolen from a piece by
Herbie Hancock.

knowledge is gravity
An attempt to write something inspired by a little reading about String Theory.

pfMENTUM CD033

PFMCD033