David Borgo / Paul Pellegrin: Kronomorphic (PFMCD059)

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[playlist ids="499"]
David Borgo and Paul Pellegrin
Kronomorfic
Micro Temporal Infundibula

David Borgo: tenor, soprano and sopranino saxophones
Bill Barrett: chromatic harmonica
Paul “Junior” Garrison: electric guitar
Nathan Hubbard: vibraphone and marimba
Danny Weller: double bass
Paul Pellegrin: drum set and hand percussion

1. Deprong Mori 6:38
2. Tehuantepec 4:27
3. Perambulate 8:26
4. Dendochrone Currents 8:01
5. Gnomon 8:03
6. Repolarization 6:22
7. Jeannot’s Knife 6:11
8. Autopoiesis 5:56
9. Ossuary 6:30

Special guests:Jeff Kaiser – trumpet and live electronics on Jeannot’s Knife
Evan Adams – oboe on Gnomon
Perambulate composed by David Borgo© 2010 by David Borgo Music, ASCAP
All other songs composed by Paul Pellegrin© 2010 by Paul Pellegrin Music, ASCAP
All songs arranged by David BorgoProduced by David Borgo and Paul Pellegrin
Recorded by Joe Kucera at UC San Diego, Studio A
Mixed by Joe Kucera and David Borgo
Mastered by Jeff Kaiser
Special thanks to Mike Saul and Shawn Fleming
Dedicated to Veronica, Elian and Lola Pellegrinand to Sylvia, Diego and Joaquin Borgo
www.kronomorfic.com

Liner Notes:

“Any detailed description of this phenomenon would baffle the layman, but any comprehensible explanation would insult an expert.” —Kurt Vonnegut

We live our lives in time, but we experience our life across time, as a dynamic and complex overlay of temporal narratives that shape meaning. Folklore, history and culture all saturate space with time, and our personal evolving time-place nexus helps us to make sense of the multiple contexts we embody and experience.
One of music’s most laudable qualities may be its ability to bring us fully into the present, but it does this via its own complex layering of sound, space and time. “Infundibula” comes from the Latin word for funnel, and it is used to describe, among other things, a variety of funnel-like structures in the lungs, heart, kidneys, ovaries and brain. Kurt Vonnegut adopted the term in his novel The Sirens of Titan to describe a kind of wormhole through time and space “where all the different kinds of truths fit together.”

Kronomorfic is a collaborative effort to explore layers of musical time that coexist and interweave in ever more complex interrelationships. The compositions are mostly structured using hybrid rhythmic phrases in polymetric time (e.g., 5/3/4, 6/7/9, 8/12/15). These hybrid phrases provide the clave (or “key”) from which the melodic counterpoint, rhythmic modulation and improvisations emerge. For us, Micro Temporal Infundibula are intermediary time strata within these claves that allow disparate and seemingly conflicting rhythms to communicate with one another.

Deprong Mori was named for a species of bat in Venezuela (the “piercing devil”) believed to be able to penetrate solid objects. Technically the song alternates sections with meters of 10, 9 and 13 beats, but these shifts can be heard as different perceptual facets of a sonic prism formed by a single interlocking ostinato. Tehuantepec, the Isthmus that represents the shortest distance between the Gulf of Mexico and the Pacific Ocean, may evoke the marimba melodies from that region, but here they take on an entirely new character in a 10-beat meter. The loping drum and bass patterns of Perambulate create a 3-against-4 feel that underlies the tune’s polychordal harmony and outward-bound solos. Dendochrone Currents, an elliptical reference to the science of tree ring dating, starts with a meditative guitar intro and then establishes a polymeter of 12/15/8 (with the marimba, horns, and bass respectively) before launching into solos over a 6-against-9 feel (with an implied stratum of 4). Gnomon, named for the part of the sundial that casts a shadow, starts with a collective free improvisation that leads into alternating sections of 12 and 9 beats. The soloing is over a heated Balkan-inspired feel that alternates 2-3-2-2-2-3-2-3-2-3 with 2-3-2-2-3-3-3.

Repolarization combines a vibes part in 7, a horn melody in 6, and a bass line in 9. The “polarity” of the title refers to the way in which the horns and vibes synchronize only at the beginning of their phrases in the A sections and only at the end of their phrases in the B sections. Jeannot’s Knife, a French parable about a knife whose blade and handle has been replaced 15 times, raises the question of whether an object which has had all its component parts replaced remains fundamentally the same object. The reference here is both to the way in which the composition unfolded—with an initial rhythmic structure generating a melody that, in turn, implied a different rhythmic structure—and to how the horns and vibes create their melodic phrases anew each time by selecting pitches from a pre-given hexachord. Rhythmically, the vibes and horns phrase in 7-against-5 (heard in the hi-hat), while the bowed bass plays a repeating 7-beat phrase across the meter of 5. The hand drumming cycles with two iterationsof the bass line and can be counted 3-3-3-5. The trumpet-with-live-electronics solo by special guest Jeff Kaiser seems to push the paradox of the title even further, as the notion of “component parts” gives way to a feeling of hybridity and distributed agency.

Autopoiesis, or “self-creation,” refers to any system that regenerates itself, acting as both producer and product. It offers an intriguing metaphor for the way in which the rhythms of these complex claves often seem to generate one another. Two claves are used in this tune: 3/4/5/ and 3/5/7. The bass plays in 5 throughout, while the horn melody modulates between3 and 7, and the vibes between 4 and 3. Ossuary was inspired (even haunted) by a visit to the ossuary in Kutna Hora, Czech Republic, a chapel with chandeliers, candelabra, chalices and a coat of arms all made from human bones. The tune starts with a clave of 6/8/5 (in the drums, vibes and bass respectively) that alternates with a 9-against-6 feel when the horns enter, before giving way to a contrasting section in a 9/8/6/ clave (in the bass, horns, and vibes respectively). The improvised solos happen over the “big 9” in the bass, then the melody returns and slowly recedes as the drums, bowed bass, vibes and electric guitar all come to rest.

pfMENTUM CD059

PFMCD095

Colter Frazier and Rob Wallace Duo (PFMCD048)

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[playlist ids="463"]
Tenor Sax: Colter Frazier
Percussion: Rob Wallace

1. Prelude (5:38)
2. The Creek (6:55)
3. Banana Sandwich (5:56)
4. Ballad (6:12)
5. TGC (8:03)
6. Factory (8:33)
7. Vignette 1 (1:46)
8. Vignette 2 (1:30)
9. Vignette 3 (1:16)
10. The Window (3:40)

All Music © 2007 Colter Frazier Music (ASCAP) and RNAWALLACE MUSIC (ASCAP)

Special thanks to Steve Jay, Miles Jay, Wayne Peet, Jeff Kaiser,
Tessa Dickinson, Ted Coe, Danielle Siano, and YOU.
These improvisations were recorded by Miles Jay at Muse Ranch on March 18th, 2007. They were mixed by Miles Jay and mastered by Wayne Peet at Newzone Studio, Los Angeles, on July 30th, 2007.
CD tray photo by Ted Coe. Inner sleeve photo by Tessa Dickinson. Graphic Design by Danielle Siano.

pfMENTUM CD048

PFMCD048

Steuart Liebig / MINIM: Quicksilver (PFMCD023)

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[playlist ids="405,407"]
Steuart Liebig / MINIM

Quicksilver

Ellen Burr: Flute, Piccolo and Alto Flute

Jeff Gauthier: Electric 4 and 5-String Violins

Jeanette Kangas: Drumset, Percussion and Vibraphone

Steuart Liebig: C, Eb and Prepared Contrabass guitars

1-23: Mosaic – (51:38)
24: Chrysanthemum – (15:37)
25: A Single Rosehip Bursts in Praise – (12:21

Copyright 2004 Steuart Liebig/Sisong Music (ASCAP)

Recorded April 2002, by Wayne Peet
Mixed June and October 2003, and March and July 2004
by Wayne Peet and Steuart Liebig; all at Newzone Studios, Mar Vista, California

Jeff Gauthier plays 4- and 5-string electric violins made by Rich Barbera, and a bow made by some dead French guy.

Jeanette Kangas (formerly known as Jeanette Wrate) plays
Paiste cymbals exclusively.

Steuart Liebig plays Fodera Basses, uses the Raven Labs PMB-1,
and uses Thomastik-Infeld Jazz Flats strings (C basses) and Fodera roundwound strings (Eb and C basses).

Live Band and dancer (Belinda Cheng and John Dowell) photos by Anthony Cheng. Band rehearsal photos by Belinda Cheng.

Cover photos/montages by Steuart Liebig.
Thanks to David Poelman for digital assistance
Layout by Steuart Liebig and Jeff Kaiser.

Thanks Leslie, Anya and Aron.

“Mosaic” is a piece made up of 23 miniatures based on haiku. “Chrysanthemum” is a single movement of 14 parts. “A Single Rosehip Bursts in Praise” was written for a collaboration with choreographer Belinda Cheng for the Auricle Dance Company and premiered on 17 November 2002.

NOTES:

Mosaic: 23 Miniatures After Haiku

The idea for a piece comprised of a group of 23 miniatures for small improvising ensemble has been one that I had kept in the back of my mind and in small sketchbooks for some four years. I envisioned an ensemble in which I would be able to utilize some of the “prepared bass” and less “bass-like” techniques that I had been using for a number of years. Additionally, I wanted to write for some less-usual (for me) techniques for both tuned and untuned percussion and a standard melody instrument. Finally, after many years of languishing as only sketches, these miniatures were written in a fairly short time.

There were a few catalysts for this seemingly sudden turnaround. One was that I had just finished a long-term writing and recording project that consisted of four long-form pieces (now released as Pomegranate, on Cryptogramaphone Records) and, still feeling the creative ferment from that experience, needed the opportunity to do much shorter pieces that were formally less involved (though, as whole group, the overall structure does have some formal complexities and is pretty long!). The second was the decision to move from a trio setting to a quartet setting, thereby opening up more orchestrational possibilities. Third, I decided to base the pieces on haiku; rather than choosing specific poems, however, I chose to base the pieces on some of the syllabic rules of haiku—while hopefully achieving some of the brevity, feeling and wonder that one experiences from reading this sort of poem.

As such, these 23 pieces are all based on the number 17—a piece may have 17 measures, thematic material made up of 17 notes, etc. The overall piece is structured to have a solo piece (four) for each member of the quartet; a duet and trio for the different possible groupings in the quartet (six and four, respectively); and nine pieces for the full quartet. I tried to have contrasting sections and parts that referred back to other parts of the overall piece and to evoke differing moods and emotions throughout.

A Single Rosehip Bursts in Praise

This piece was written as part of a collaboration with choreographer/dancer Belinda Cheng. The title comes from a passage in the novel, Art & Lies, by Jeanette Winterson. The piece itself is broken into two major sections. The first is a sort of unfolding that the phrase suggested to me. The second is a more pictorial setting of the action in the book: three people (the characters Handel, Sappho and Picasso) on a subway, each with his/her own thoughts.

Chrysanthemum

This piece is based on the structure of a sonnet: 14 lines of 10 syllables each. In this case, I have “cells” of 10 notes (stated at the beginning and end as two 5-notes chords) that I have treated in a more or less serial fashion in 14 discrete sections. That is, each written section of the piece uses only those 10 original notes, though they are reordered or split between the various players. Again, I have split the quartet that performs the piece into some of its component parts: each player gets a solo and there are four trios, the remaining six sections are for the full quartet. Again, I attempted to have contrasting sections. Whereas Mosaic is played in 23 sections with breaks, this piece is performed as one continuous whole.

pfMENTUM CD023

PFMCD023

Emily Hay: Like Minds (PFMCD022)

Louis Lopez 1 Comment

[playlist ids="403"]
This recording represents various musical projects in which I have participated over the past few years. All tracks are improvisations with no overdubs or second takes, with the exception of “A Year and Two Weeks” where a vocal track was added. “Call To Unarm” and “Like Minds” are from live concert performances, and “A Year and Two Weeks,” “Swamp Moss,” “Waiting For Sara” and “Crooked Hopscotch” were recorded direct to two track tape, with no multi-track mixing. Special thanks to all of the musicians who performed on these recordings, to Lee Scott, Randy Fuelle and Wayne Peet for their engineering expertise, to Annette Buhl for her photography and to Jeff Kaiser for his artwork design and support in releasing this disc.

-Emily Hay, 1.1.05
www.emilyhay.com

Emily Hay • Like Minds

1. CALL TO UNARM 8:56
Emily Hay – Flute, Alto Flute, Voice • Ronit Kirchman – Violin, Voice • Brad Dutz – Percussion • Joe Berardi – Percussion
2. LITURGY OF SOUND 5:40
Emily Hay – Flute, Voice • Lisle Ellis – Electronics, Bass • Marcos Fernandes – Percussion, Field Recordings
3. A YEAR AND TWO WEEKS 4:01
Emily Hay – Voice • Michael Whitmore – Guitar • Brad Dutz – Synthesizer
4. BOILED CADILLAC 4:35
Emily Hay – Flute • Wayne Peet – Piano • Brad Dutz – Percussion
5. CROOKED HOPSCOTCH 8:18
Emily Hay – Flute, Voice • Sara Schoenbeck – Bassoon • Michael Intriere – Cello • Brad Dutz – Percussion
6. WE ARE 6:16
Emily Hay – Flute, Voice • Marcos Fernandes – Percussion
7. LIKE MINDS 7:09
Emily Hay – Piccolo, Voice • Ronit Kirchman – Violin, Voice • Kurt Heyl – Trombone, Voice
8. WHA’ ‘BOUT 9:32
Emily Hay – Flute, Alto Flute, Voice • Steuart Leibig – Bass • Rich West – Drums, Background Recordings
9. SPAR 2:31
Emily Hay – Flute, Voice • Lisle Ellis – Electronics, Bass • Marcos Fernandes – Percussion, Field Recordings
10. WAITING FOR SARA 3:06
Emily Hay – Voices • Michael Intriere – Cellos • Brad Dutz – Percussion
11. HIBIKI 5:36
Emily Hay – Flute • Marcos Fernandes – Percussion
12. SWAMP MOSS 2:30
Emily Hay – Voice • Michael Whitmore – Guitar • Brad Dutz – Melodica

1. Recorded by Jeff Kaiser at Ventura City Hall, Ventura, CA 2004 Mastered by Lee Scott, Glendale, CA 2004
2. Recorded by Randy Fuelle, Hit Single Studios, San Diego, CA 2004 Mixed and mastered by Mark Wheaton, Catasonic Studios, Los Angeles, CA 2004
3. Recorded by Brad Dutz in North Hollywood, CA circa 1994
4. Overdub recorded/mixed by Wayne Peet, Newzone Studios, Los Angeles, CA 1997 Mastered by Lee Scott, Glendale, CA 2004
4. Recorded and mixed by Wayne Peet, Newzone Studios, Los Angeles, CA 1997 Mastered by Lee Scott, Glendale, CA 2004
5. Recorded by Brad Dutz, Tujunga, CA circa 2000 Mastered by Lee Scott, Glendale, CA 2004
6. Recorded by Randy Fuelle, Hit Single Studios, San Diego, CA 2004 Mixed and mastered by Lee Scott, Glendale, CA 2004
7. Recorded by Ronit Kirchman/Jeremy Drake, Asto Gallery, Los Angeles, CA 2003 Mastered by Lee Scott, Glendale, CA 2004
8. Recorded and mixed by Wayne Peet, Newzone Studios, Los Angeles, CA 1997 Mastered by Lee Scott, Glendale, CA 2004
9. Recorded by Randy Fuelle, Hit Single Studios, San Diego, CA 2004 Mixed and mastered by Mark Wheaton, Catasonic Studios, Los Angeles, CA
10. Recorded by Brad Dutz, Tujunga, CA circa 2000 Mastered by Lee Scott, Glendale, CA 2004
11. Recorded by Randy Fuelle, Hit Single Studios, San Diego, CA 2003 Mixed and mastered by Lee Scott, Glendale, CA 2004
12. Recorded by Brad Dutz, North Hollywood, CA 1994 Mastered by Lee Scott, Glendale, CA 2004

Photography: Annette Buhl • Art Design and Layout: Jeff Kaiser
(p) Emily C. Hay 2005, (c) Emily Hay Music, publishing administered by Emily Hay Music (BMI). All rights reserved. For more information: pfMENTUM • PO Box 1653 • Ventura • CA • 93002 • www.pfmentum.com

pfMENTUM CD022

PFMCD022

Steuart Liebig / The Mentones: Locustland (PFMCD017)

Louis Lopez 1 Comment

[playlist ids="389"]
Steuart Liebig/The Mentones
LOCUSTLAND

The Mentones
Tony Atherton: alto saxophone
Joseph Berardi: drumset, percussion
Bill Barrett: chromatic harmonica
Steuart Liebig: contrabassguitar

broom – – 3:27
graveyard – – 4:41
mojave boxcar – – 4:46
drifter – – 7:47
honky tonk burn – – 6:48
westpoint, mississipi – – 8:19
small fry – – 0:45
burnt umber – – 2:50
nighthawk – – 5:43
howl & tumble – – 4:01
gasoline jelly – – 6:33
lightning bug – – 3:47
nowhere calling – – 5:57

©2004, steuart liebig/sisong music (ascap)
recorded at newzone studios, by wayne peet;
mixed at newzone studios, by wayne peet and steuart liebig
mar vista, california, 2000

photos/montages by steuart liebig
layout by steuart liebig and jeff kaiser
gear thanks to fodera basses, thomastik-infeld strings and raven labs

“First let’s talk about Steuart Liebig, the multi-faceted miscreant who squeezed the hybrid beast known as the Mentones out of his juicy mind. Steuart is well known in L.A. as one of the most significant improvising electric bass torturers and electronic manipulators in recent memory and, I’m grateful to say, a major contributor to most of the music I’ve done in the last decade and a half. The metaphor of a diamond with its many facets comes to mind, but that doesn’t quite get it. Imagine the diamond periodically reverting to its primal molten state and shooting out semi-controlled bursts of radioactive plasma melting everything in its reach. I could say that for Steuart the Mentones is an anomaly, but in a way every project he constructs is an anomaly. I will say this—there is nothing like the Mentones on this earth that I’ve ever heard of and even though you may recognize some of its disparate original elements, you will be whacked by how cohesively they come together in Liebig’s compositions. An adult dose of Little Walter crashing his Coupe de Ville into Ornette Coleman’s harmolodien. Howling Wolf gnawing on John Coltrane’s left ear like Mike Tyson. As for the other men in the Mentones: Bill Barrett takes the chromatic harp well beyond its limits like a rubber band stretched into a Mobius strip. Tony Atherton is soulful, relentless and driving. Joe Berardi grooves these odd time signatures like his mother nursed him on non-Euclidean geometry. It’s all that and it’s definitely enough.”

– G.E. Stinson

pfMENTUM CD017

PFMCD017